Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
greetings all...

i shared this with my local club but thought i'd share it with the ladies too...

first of all, thank god for divine timing and blessings of near misses
second of all, thank god for frame sliders

i was in rush-hour traffic yesterday and was attempting to navigate
a sensible turnaround, instead of a u-turn.

i heard sirens, but couldn't determine exactly the direction. no one
around me was pulling over and i didn't see anything in the mirrors.
all clear for the left turn since the light ahead was red. unfortunately,
an emergency vehicle was traveling on the LEFT side of the road as
i was pulling off to make the left turn.

the flash of lights startled me and the vehicle swerved and flew by.
i hit the breaks quick with a lean and the wheel turned and the bike
plopped down. hit the cut-off switch.

at this point i'm thinking, *zhit, how am i gonna pick this thing up?*

by now the light had turned green and here comes traffic. *zhit, zhit, zhit*

miraculously, the bike seems light as i squat, lift, push, prop (with my leg)
one more push, hold the break, swing my leg over, start her up, pull into
the turning lane. thanks to frame sliders, no damage, tank or otherwise.

i'm thinking the adrenaline helped me get the bike up by myself as i had
never actually done it before, and i didn't even use the "easier" technique
several people have suggested.

i proceed to teach yoga class (themed: thankfulness and gratitude).
after class, i get back into my leathers, meet up with my sweetie, and we
headed out to meet friends. it's a good thing i got right back to riding.

interestingly, it kinda helped me to relax a little bit. it wasn't that bad.
yes, it was slow, but i felt a little less anxious about getting the bike up
by myself. thank god it's not a bigger/heavier bike.

lesson: if there's an emergency vehicle around, when in doubt, stay put
until the sirens fade or you see the vehicle pass you. triple check the
mirrors and turn around.

thanks for reading and thanks for riding,
~~ empress duc ~~
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,395 Posts
Sorry I didn't say hi last night! I saw you in the distance at Rhodeside. Now I'm thinking I should have gone over and given you a hug! I didn't realize you guys weren't coming downstairs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,487 Posts
Glad to hear that you're OK. [thumbsup] It happens to the best of us, or so I've heard...I'm not one of "the best." That might explain why after nearly 5 years of riding I nearly lost it pulling into a spot at the parking garage near work. I was coming in a little quick and my bars hit the steering lock. I wasn't expecting that and I had to stick a leg out to catch myself. Durrrr.... [laugh] I just figure that type of crap should have ended a while ago, ya know? Granted, it doesn't sound like a big deal, but that type of stuff never happens to me anymore. I haven't had to pick my bike up in a while--I barely managed it last time and that was several years ago. Kudos to you for being able to! Your story reminds me that I need to refresh myself on how to lift one of these suckers, just in case. [thumbsup]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the support ladies.

i would highly recommend
1. frame sliders to protect the bike
2. practicing picking up the bike


i know i'm going to be practicing a bit more
so i can feel confident without a near miss
pumping me full of superwoman adrenaline.

be safe out there!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Let me echo Emily - although I did say hello, I had no idea what had happened. I would have talked about something besides yoga! [laugh] I'm glad you're ok and doubly glad you got back on the bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
335 Posts
Good job. Good luck. Yep, the little monsters are actually quite easy to pick-up. I took a MSF rider's course a couple of years ago and we practiced picking-up a bike about the same size (Buell Blast). The one thing I remembered was that if the bike is on its right side, be sure to extend the kickstand before picking it up. Use the leverage of your legs to help right the bike. It had been over 3 years since taking that course, but I dropped my 696 on its right side along a road when I stopped to assist what I thought was an injured cyclist. I had stopped on a hill and after helping the bicyclist I wanted to move the 696 to the crest of the hill by simply pushing it. I didn't notice that my feet were in some pea gravel and my feet went out from under me and over went the bike with me on top of it. Yes, I have frame, bar end, and rear sliders. Only damage was to the rear brake pedal, which I bent back into shape without a problem. Having spent 26 years as a military pilot we had a saying: "It's better to be lucky than to be good." and "Never trade luck for skill."
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top