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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I monster is sitting in the garage with new sprockets (15/43) installed and a brand new DID chain strung around the sprockets unattatched due to the chain being to long... AHHHHHHH...

So where do I get a bloody chain cutter and how much do they cost???

thanks.
 

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Not sure what you mean by locking pin. There are 2 types of master links, one with a clip that holds the side plates on, and one with rivets that you need a tool to press into place. Whe you bought your chain, you should have gotten one or the other with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
now that I have the chain the right size I put the "master link" ? in place to attach both ends of the chain together I dont know what to do from here..

Do I put pressure on both sides to make the link connect or something??
(sorry for the poor picture quality, I am kinda in a hurry... )

 

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If you want to use a rivet master, then yes you need the tool. You should be easily able to get a clip type master at most any bike shop. There is no clear consensus on which is better. If you go with the clip type, most people would recomend you safety wire the clip on.
 

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not sure if this will help, but here goes.....

my room mate has a GSXR 1000 that he just re-did the chain on. The master link was one that was a pin that went through, then needed to be mushroomed on the other end, a rivet type I would guess. He uses a 6 inch C-clamp and either a BB or small steel ball bearing. Put the BB/bearing in the end that needs to be mushroomed and put the C-clamp on either of the pin, and squeeze. It forces the BB into the dimple of pin causing it to spread. He has done this on multiple bikes, never had one let go.
 

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nolio said:
Do I put pressure on both sides to make the link connect or something??
(sorry for the poor picture quality, I am kinda in a hurry... )
Nolio: It looks like you're using a DID X-ring gold chain. I just installed one of these on my S2R. Even with the clip type link, the side plate requires considerable pressure to seat enough to allow the clip to slide on. This is unlike any other clip type chain I've installed, which pops on with basically little effort. I needed to use a channel pliers to carefully press the side plate on far enough to secure the clip. Be patient and you will get it. Joe X
 

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Supero100 said:
Really? I thought the only reason shops used the clips is because they're faster and the rivet tools break after x uses (where x is some number that makes their use not cost-effective).
I guess I based that comment on discussions here some time ago. It seemed some people prefered clips, and had no problems with them, others prefered pressed. I don't know what shops use as I do my own, but I can't imagine htere isn't a pro-level chain tool that won't break ( for 11tybillion dollars, of course). I also can't imagine that a shop would use clips to save a little time if they had a higher failure rate.

Scrufdog said:
not sure if this will help, but here goes.....

my room mate has a GSXR 1000 that he just re-did the chain on. The master link was one that was a pin that went through, then needed to be mushroomed on the other end, a rivet type I would guess. He uses a 6 inch C-clamp and either a BB or small steel ball bearing. Put the BB/bearing in the end that needs to be mushroomed and put the C-clamp on either of the pin, and squeeze. It forces the BB into the dimple of pin causing it to spread. He has done this on multiple bikes, never had one let go.
Good on yer roomy for being creative. Seems like it would be awful easy to scrrew it up, and chain failure would cost way way more than the tool to do it right
 

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Ddan said:
I guess I based that comment on discussions here some time ago. It seemed some people prefered clips, and had no problems with them, others prefered pressed. I don't know what shops use as I do my own, but I can't imagine htere isn't a pro-level chain tool that won't break ( for 11tybillion dollars, of course). I also can't imagine that a shop would use clips to save a little time if they had a higher failure rate.
Both good points - and I wasn't disagreeing with you either, just kind of wondering out loud. For what it's worth, my chain has a clip... I should probably safety wire it though, that's a good idea.
 

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Supero100 said:
Both good points - and I wasn't disagreeing with you either, just kind of wondering out loud. For what it's worth, my chain has a clip... I should probably safety wire it though, that's a good idea.
No worries, I didn't think you were disagreeing, just letting you know my views were based on nothing but thin air and the opinions expressed by some of the esteemed members of this here board. The only issue I had with the clip was the safety wire made it a PITA to clean the chain. It kept catching on the rag.
 

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Get a rivit tool. My arse and my engine cases are worth way more than a $110 DID chain rivit tool. Pressed on rivit master is more reliable - by far.
 

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Scrufdog said:
not sure if this will help, but here goes.....

my room mate has a GSXR 1000 that he just re-did the chain on. The master link was one that was a pin that went through, then needed to be mushroomed on the other end, a rivet type I would guess. He uses a 6 inch C-clamp and either a BB or small steel ball bearing. Put the BB/bearing in the end that needs to be mushroomed and put the C-clamp on either of the pin, and squeeze. It forces the BB into the dimple of pin causing it to spread. He has done this on multiple bikes, never had one let go.
I've replaced a LOT of chains on both bicycles and motorcycles. This is a fine way to do it...this is doing the same thing that a rivet tool would do. I've done this in the past and have not had any issues. Just make sure the link is free and not binding once you tighten it. And keep an eye on the link periodically.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I have already talked to Chris as of Friday night... He is sending me a chain breaker / riveting tool.. after 2 day shipping I will have paid like $118 I believe...

If I had of checked back to this thread I would have tried the mentioned method above !! but now since the tool should be here tomorrow I will try and hold off.

Thanks for all the help and suggestions everyone.. they are greatly appreciated !!
 

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Ddan said:
If you want to use a rivet master, then yes you need the tool. You should be easily able to get a clip type master at most any bike shop. There is no clear consensus on which is better. If you go with the clip type, most people would recomend you safety wire the clip on.
Actually, most shops I know do not want even a hint of liability for knowingly installing faulty connecting links. (the clip type). You can't safety wire them, it falls off. You can try epoxying them, but that, too, is ineffective. All the hardcore stalwarts who cling to the clip eventually get bitten by them. DiD has stopped shipping street bike chains with clip links...

From my observation, Ducatis are far more vulnerable to breaking a case than the average bike. Under prior ownership, Cycleworks made it policy to never install clip links after we had 3 or 4 chains fall off one summer. We tried it all to keep them on. It just isn't worth it. We were lucky in that there was no incidental damage from the chains that we installed coming off.

We have seen some wild stuff, though, from other instances of chains coming off. One GXSR750 was about shredded. The guy's leg cut, the tail section torn, lots of stuff. The passenger peg probably saved his leg from a lot more trauma.

Supero100 said:
Really? I thought the only reason shops used the clips is because they're faster and the rivet tools break after x uses (where x is some number that makes their use not cost-effective).
When used properly, the tools never break. I've had my chain tools for going on 10 years now. When people are in a hurry or hamfist the tools, parts of them will break on the first use. So you buy replacements...

Anyhow, I know I'm not the final word on this, and 10 people will pipe up claiming success with clip links for all their bikes for years and years. But I'm sure I've installed 2 to 6 times as many chains and I'll never put a clip link on a motorcycle again.

:)
Chris
 
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