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When you look straight and not through the turn you go - STRAIGHT!

The bike doesn't look to me like it has major damage, that is if I buy the dumpload of tiny pieces it looks to me like I could ride it again. It was still running when I fell and started up fine when I got it home, so the most expensive part is OK.

I just don't know whether I want to ride this bike on the street again, or ever.

I know I want to take a class away from the street so I understand how I failed, and learn to correct my errors. I know I want to do trackdays so if I fall I don't have to explain it to people that want use the situation to take money from me.

I am just not sure where to start.

Jason
 

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I know its got to be tough to get back on after a spill but I think you are 90% of the way there when you are talking about taking a class. I took the MSF class to get my license back in 2001 and after picking up my M1100 a few months back I took an experienced rider course from them too. I would highly recommend the MSF or variant that is offered in your area. Not sure if this is your first bike or not, but taking a 2.5 day Basic course can't hurt.

Good Luck!

Ride Safe
sp00f
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was thinking about the advanced course. I am also considering one of those track courses as I imagine it will help me to appreciate the depth of the bike's capacity and help me to focus with more seat time at speed.
 

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if you want to get some confidence back on two wheels before getting back on a motorcycle, i can highly recommend plenty of cycling (preferably every day).

you don't mention speed, environment or any other factors contributing to your off.
if a car driver has an accident, everyone would expect them to drive that car again once it was fixed.

the basic MSF course will only teach you so much, but it will teach slow speed control.
read up on some of the excellent motorcycling books out there and practice lots:

- Proficient Motorcycling by David Hough
- Smooth Riding by Reg Pridmore
- A Twist of The Wrist (I&II) by Kieth Code
- total Control by Lee Parks

try to always get something positive out of a negative experience.

your confidence and ego has just taken a battering, so it's natural to question everything. just get back to executing all the fundamentals as well as you can as soon as you can. the rest will follow.

and i do speak from personal experience (spent 2 1/2 years on crutches from a pretty bad drunk driver interaction).

all the best :)
 

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did you take the basic MSF course?
might want to do that first if you havent....

some track schools are more instructional than others...try to find one that splits the time between riding and classroom

your accident is the most common beginner mistake.
think you are going too fast into a corner, panic, stand up the bike, hit the brake, and look straight and go right off the road (ive done it too)
if you think you are too fast in a corner, the bike will make it...you just have to look at the end of the corner and counter-steer more....
 

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MSF won't teach anyone to take a corner at speed, but it will break down basics. and yes, i do practice tight turns and figure 8'S.

it's impossible to practice everything on every ride, so i try focusing and practicing on just one specific element to concentrate and train on during a normal 20-50 mile ride.
sometimes i will focus on progressive braking and include in a couple of emergency stops (if safe to do so). other times i will work on my lines and flow. it doesn't really matter what i am practicing, but the idea is that i'm always working at something very specific, as opposed to the general ride. i even practice braking past the apex of a bend because i can. i practice doing all the wrong things that will upset the bike as much as i do the right.

i ride all year round.i ride in the rain and when it's miserably cold (not when there is a chance of black ice, though). i ride on gravely roads and deeply rutted country lanes where i haven't got a clue where i'm going.

of course, this can be extremely boring as well as highly valuable. it doesn't matter how bored i get working on lane discipline if it makes me a better rider. i refuse to wear day-glow clothing, so it's up to me to try and return home in exactly the same condition i left.
in short, find whatever works for you. now it's getting a bit cooler in d.c. i'll be dusting of the bicycle and put some miles on that (feels very weird to ride without full gear).

yesterday, at a very busy 4-way intersection, i was waiting to turn left across 2 lanes of oncoming traffic. i guy on a scooter pulls up right next to me, wearing no helmet, no gloves and trainers and a big smile. i look at him while he's asking stupid car driver type questions about the monster.
i tell him he's a braver man than me. he asks why, and i reply by pointing to my helmet, then my armoured gloves. he shrugs and says that he 'justs' rides locally. i reply that locally is exactly where most accidents occur and execute my turn.

i never, ever want to be that guy, but i am looking forward to my very first track day next year :)
 

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how's jogging going to help cooking a bend on a motorcycle?
i don't jog. 2 artificial hip replacements (same hip) courtesy of the drunk driver and me not recognising the hazard unfolding before me quick enough to avoid the collision.

besides, people just look either angry, look like they need to use the bathroom, or just plain miserable jogging :)

in short, that cold, icy fear that grips your balls when you reach that 'moment' we all experience every so often when we push it isn't going to go away by jogging, but riding a bicycle can teach you a lot about grip and traction, as will trying to ride a motorcycle as often as possible (min 100 rides/ 8,000 miles a year).

last winter, i didn't see ONE sportsbike rider on the roads around D.C. i would see the occasional harley rider, the odd goldwing, and of course, those annoyingly well-cossetted bmw riders...

i'm considering trying to fit the hypermotard protectors on the 1100 this coming winter to help with cold hands.
 

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Does anyone know of any courses in Georgia? I wanted to do a track school until I saw the price at Road Atlanta. Has anyone done one of these? Was it worth the money? Will it help for just normal everyday riding....I have no intention of trying to race.
 

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don't know of anything in the georgia area, but i'm sure others will be able to point you in the right direction.

i too have no intention of racing, but i feel i will learn an awful lot from a good track instruction school which will help my everyday riding. just the experience has to be worth it.
 

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besides, people just look either angry, look like they need to use the bathroom, or just plain miserable jogging :)

those annoyingly well-cossetted bmw riders...
Hey, I resemble both of those remarks!

My GF and I are taking the Total Control class (run by Lee Parks) at Frederick Community College on Sept 26th. From reading his book, it looks like he breaks down the mechanics of turns in detail and has a good approach to teaching it. He claims it is a class that bridges the gap between street riding and the track.
 

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i too have read his book and like his approach - actually just started re-reading it.

want to do the course, but don't think we can make the sept. 26th date as the wife's 696 is in the shop with a non-starting issue, and i'm taking my bike in today (oil leak problem). knowing how long it takes to get any parts, i can't go ahead and book us up.

http://www.totalcontroltraining.net/HTML/Schedule.html

other than that it would have to be the october courses in columbia or frederick, MD, but we'll be in england from the 3rd to the 12th.

have a great time and report back on the course. i'm sure it will spur others who are thinking of taking it.

cheers.
 

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I don't know about others but I had to sell the bike I crashed on. I lowsided last spring doing about 70 km/h. My gear saved me and I didn't have a single scratch on me and actually rode away from the crash despite damage to the bike.

After I crashed, I just couldn't get comfortable on that bike. I felt like it had let me down and I just didn't trust cornering or braking hard on it anymore. I had to sell the bike and replace it with a different model until I felt comfortable riding again.
 

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My gear saved me and I didn't have a single scratch on me and actually rode away from the crash despite damage to the bike.
glad you were o.k. proof as to why we wear gear...
 
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