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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I'm trying to figure out a noise my bike has been making for a while now. It recently got worse so that I've decided not to ride it until this gets fixed. The noise sounds like a dragging as if the chain were too loose and is rubbing on something as the bike moves. It happens when the bike (therefore chain) is moving, the bike can be on or off.
Anyways, I when I checked the chain tension, it seemed -maybe- a little loose - so I tightened it via the swingarm bolts. For a test I tightened the chain tighter than spec. Still the same noise...
I was noticing that the chain seems to almost rub on that metal runner that is directly under it just before the chain goes into the drive gear. Is that normal?

The bike is new to me but has almost 15k miles. Any ideas here? Could the chain itself be out of spec so as to not correctly line up with the teeth on the gear?
Thanks!
Stuart
 
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Discussion Starter #2
I'm certainly no tech expert but if the chain (like the bike) has 15k on it, it's time for a replacement.

Any chance you are hearing the rear brake dragging?
 
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Discussion Starter #3
yeah, I guess i thought of that as my next step. Anyone have a rough price range of replacing the chain?

I don't think it's the rear brake dragging. The noise definitely matches up to the links of the chain ..
click click click click click....
 

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I had a sudden onset of chain noise at about 14K (and right before replace chain and sprockets).
 
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Does anybody know of a faq or website which gives a how to on replacing chain and sprockets? I'm getting the haynes manual soon, but I need to do this work pronto.
Thanks

Stuart
 
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Discussion Starter #6
Just pull off the front sprocket cover ... pull the bolt out (gotta apply the brake while in gear to get it loose) then loosen the tension on the chain remove axle bolt remove sprocket from wheel. In the meantime cut the chain off...reattach new sprockets put everything like you found it... put new chain on... have a chainbreaker or borrow a buddies.. the other option is to trailer it to a shop and have them put the link in then adjust as usual ....make sure you have right amount of links in the chain... and always look at it six or seven times before cutting on the new chain.. hope this helps... !
 
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Discussion Starter #7
So... anybody in the Baltimore / DC area have a chain tool that they'd be willing to lend out for a bit? ;D
Considering I won't be doing this much I'm hoping I won't have to buy the tool.
Thanks for any help.
Stuart
 
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Discussion Starter #8
Another question,
when you buy a new chain specific for your bike model and year, do you still have to remove links from it to get it to fit, or does it have the correct number of links?
Is the purpose of the chain tool to unlatch a link in the new chain, wrap it around the sprockets, and then reattach it?
Sorry for beating a dead horse.

Stuart
 
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Discussion Starter #9
It is best to compare chains....many times they have an extra link or two....
 

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If it is a very noticeable click or pop, it is probably a tight link. My S4 got a really tight link on a weekend trip. It was so loud at low speeds it sounded like a screw or something stuck in the tire hitting the carbon fender. I lubed the crap out of it several times before I got home to reduce any binding and then changed it and the front sprocket, which was also farily worn. The rear sprocket was fine.
 

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Stuart - to answer your questions about chain tools and replacement chains:

A complete tool like the jumbo model Chris sells can both cut chain to length by pressing the rivets out of a link, and install a new master link by first pressing the sideplate on to the correct position and then peening the end of the post to rivet it in place. You may end up better off finding a reputable shop to cut the chain and rivet in the new link if you can get the bike there in a truck or trailer. Doesn't have to be a Ducati shop for something simple like that - but it does have to be knowledgeable and reputable and have reasonable rates. But if you are going to ride for a lot of years and miles and expect to replace a chain every 10-15K miles, buying a tool may pay for itself in 5, 10, or 15 years.

Chain usually comes in 120 link lengths. When I did my chain recently, I went up to teeth in back and added two links in the length of the chain. You can bet I fitted it about four times and counted links about 8 times before I cut the new chain to length. As it worked out I could have used the stock length of 98 links even with the bigger sprocket. But the axle would have been all the way forward in the adjusters and the tire would have had less than a quarter inch clearance inside the hugger - not enough! Adding two links ( you always add or subtract even numbers because there are an equal number of inside and outside links in a complete chain) brought the axle back to almost exactly the same marks on the adjusters as before.

If you end up hauling the bike to a shop to have it done, have you measuring done and the link marked to be cut beforehand. And be sure. If the shop wants to cut it shorter than what your measurements indicate - have them cut to your length first. The worst that can happen is that it's too long and they'll have to cut another pair off. That applies if you're cutting it too - if in doubt cut it a pair longer then install for a trial fit.

Hope that helps a little :)
 
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