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I just recently picked up my first Ducati. I've been riding since my early 20's, never anything fancy, and I'm 50 now.
I was mostly riding dual sports but I'd been wanting a proper street bike for a while now.
After doing some research into different bikes, I kept coming back to Ducati's. The first one that got my interest was a 2005 999 and it was going for a good price. It was on the market up here in Calgary for about a month and the fellow selling it lowered his price to about $6500. By the time I managed to call, it was gone. Another couple of bikes caught my eye as well, a 2017 Supersport (base) with about 2000kms on it, and the asking price on it was $9500, and then a '14 Monster 1200S had also been up for sale. It was about the mid part of November I think, and I ended up picking up the Monster at a really good price. It only had about 5600kms on it.

I guess where I'm going with this is that if you don't lock into one specific model and you're willing to consider several different models (or brands for that matter), you can have more of a selection and then choose the model within that selection that best fills your requirement for things like value, condition of the bike, mileage, motor size etc.

In the end, I really like this Monster 1200 alot but I'm sure I would have liked any of the other models I had beeen considering.
 

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Thanks CGYrider

Looking at the following...
Honda VFR 800 06, Moto Guzzi 1200 sport 07, Triumph Sprint 05, but mainly this :Ducati Monster 1100 2009 | Trade Me Motors
I had considered a VFR as well. They are legendary for reliability, comfort and smoothness. The Monster looks to be in nice shape and it sounds like the owner stayed on top of the maintenance. New tires, battery, and belts is a nice plus as well. I just ordered new tires and a set of belts (I’ll install myself) and that cost about $700 in parts so you’re saving a bit there.
 

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Good points there CGYrider
Thanks Munter, though I hope I don't come across as any sort of expert, as I'm just getting familiarized with Monster ownership myself. Other things you may want to consider are things like maintenance requirements. If you plan to do some or most of the service work on the bike yourself, you'll need to make allowances both in terms of time and cost. Or you may wish to defer that to a shop, provided that one is close and reputable. I've just started to aggregate some of the tools I'll need for my specific Monster, and there are a few specialty items that are needed. Not terribly difficult to find or overly expensive, but nontheless it's worth researching and then considering before buying a bike such as these. I think this is the case (in general) for any motorcycle, but Ducati's have a few more more specialized service and equipment requirements than most mainstream bikes.
 

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Yeah of course, no problem Munter.
I’m sort of in the beginning stages of aggregating my own set of Ducati tools.
Now, your specific tools may be different, for whichever model you end up buying, but these are the ones that seem popular for DIY Ducati ownership.

I’m sure other members here could add more knowledgeable information, but I think these are sort of the main specialty tools specific to my Monster 1200.

Some are also common to other Ducati service routines. I also know that a lot of people will make some of their own tooling or adapt a tool they have to make it work for a certain task. I do this alot.

-55mm, 12 point socket for rear wheel removal
-30mm, for front wheel (not that special, TBH)
-Crankshaft rotating tool and/or crankshaft TDC locking tool (not sure if I need to lock it at TDC, but seems to be a handy feature)
-Chain tensioner tool
-Camshaft tool to lock the cam sprockets in position

I think I’m just scratching the “service” here,(yes, terrible pun intended 😀), but I found a site online that rents Ducati tools and provides good explanations as to what tool is used where. It was helpful for me, as at least I can get a sense of what’s involved in the servicing and what tools are needed.
Here is the link:

 
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