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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Kia ora from New Zealand.

Greetings to the forum members wherever you may be in the world.

Thirteen months ago the petrol in my veins rose to the surface and I bought a 2016 Triumph Street twin.
This was after no riding for forty years, yes forty years, I am 68 years old.
Now after 9000kms and thirteen months I am yearning to try a Ducati.

In years past (distant past) I have owned a K1 Honda 750 four and a Yamaha 650 XS2 before turning to trials riding.

I am looking for some advice from the knowledgeable members here about what model might be best for me.
I am 5'6" 165cm and weigh 70kgs.
I am liking the look of the 821 but should I consider the 796? or something else? maybe the Monster1100?

My Triumph is 900cc with a modest HP rating but strong torque so I have ruled out the 659 engined bikes.

Any thoughts, opinions, comments are welcome.

Thanks in advance

Regards
John
 

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Uh oh......after forty eight hours and 152 views there are no comments/replies.

Did I say a bad word?..... Did I ask a dumb question?

And here I am talking to myself.
Firstly, welcome to the Asylum, John!

So many different Monsters in the almost 30 years since the original M900, and we all have our favorites. It might help to add some details as to the type of riding you primarily want to do with the Monster, whether it will replace or complement your Street Twin, whether you want something a bit more modern or vintage, whether budget is an issue, etc.

Personally, I have a 1995 M900... I love the character of that motor, and it's a very unique build with many one-off parts, so she's a favorite and a keeper. If I were in the market for a "new" Monster, I would most likely get a S4RS, mostly for the Testastretta motor (I have the rough equivalent in a Superbike), which is my favorite of the Monsters. If I were to choose something a bit more modern, I would most likely get a 1200R (also for the motor which I love). Perhaps needless to say, I like grunty motors -- for the record, I'm about your height (I'm shrinking as I age. lol) and weigh about 10kg more. It's no longer about the speed, especially as I get older, but I've had larger displacement, torquier motors for most of my riding career. That's not to say that I don't enjoy smaller, less powerful bikes. Given a choice of the three bikes you mentioned, personally, I would lean towards the 1100. I know you mentioned you were 68, but I know Sextegenarians who are a lot faster than me, and I'm not slow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for that reply Terminator.....
I have a few bikes on my watch list and there is a tidy original 1100 in the mix.
Actually I have just convinced myself that the 796 would satisfy me and they are a bit cheaper but then again there is no substitute for cubic inches or cc's.
I need to get motivated and go visit some bikes.

"I'll be back"
 

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I just recently picked up my first Ducati. I've been riding since my early 20's, never anything fancy, and I'm 50 now.
I was mostly riding dual sports but I'd been wanting a proper street bike for a while now.
After doing some research into different bikes, I kept coming back to Ducati's. The first one that got my interest was a 2005 999 and it was going for a good price. It was on the market up here in Calgary for about a month and the fellow selling it lowered his price to about $6500. By the time I managed to call, it was gone. Another couple of bikes caught my eye as well, a 2017 Supersport (base) with about 2000kms on it, and the asking price on it was $9500, and then a '14 Monster 1200S had also been up for sale. It was about the mid part of November I think, and I ended up picking up the Monster at a really good price. It only had about 5600kms on it.

I guess where I'm going with this is that if you don't lock into one specific model and you're willing to consider several different models (or brands for that matter), you can have more of a selection and then choose the model within that selection that best fills your requirement for things like value, condition of the bike, mileage, motor size etc.

In the end, I really like this Monster 1200 alot but I'm sure I would have liked any of the other models I had beeen considering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I guess where I'm going with this is that if you don't lock into one specific model and you're willing to consider several different models (or brands for that matter), you can have more of a selection and then choose the model within that selection that best fills your requirement for things like value, condition of the bike, mileage, motor size etc.
I agree with you.....I am looking at various models and even a Honda and a Guzzi
 

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hey Munter, welcome to the forum !
I will give you a different perspective (since I know little to nothing about bikes, I just love riding them) I'm the sort of guy that needs to look at the bike or car and fall in love with it each time I see it. Tell you a quick story...my 2nd car...(back in Argentina) I found one that I loved, colour, year, money, kms, all the bells and whistles HOWEVER my father (looking it from a business point of view) tried to convince me to buy the same car but latest model and brand new. I knew he was right, same money but a brand new car ...makes total sense, right ?... Well, I couldn't. Yes good idea but I couldn't picture myself driving it and it didn't have any additional accessories, just basics so it was no no.

Basically, what I'm trying to say here is besides de brand/model/torque/cc look at the bike and see how you feel. When I bought my current (also 1st bike) it was a bit easier...I'm a learner so that took out of the picture lots of options BUT I knew exactly what I wanted (M659 red and white)...god I love that mix of colours. Lots of my friends tried to convince me to get a Ninja 300 or a KTM but they don't look as good as mine (personal opinion) . I'm in love with her, what can I say, she is gorgeous :)

In short, look and the bike and if she doesn't put a smile on your face then (personally) is not for you.

Hope it helps you and that you find your bike soon :)
 

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Thanks CGYrider

Looking at the following...
Honda VFR 800 06, Moto Guzzi 1200 sport 07, Triumph Sprint 05, but mainly this :Ducati Monster 1100 2009 | Trade Me Motors
I had considered a VFR as well. They are legendary for reliability, comfort and smoothness. The Monster looks to be in nice shape and it sounds like the owner stayed on top of the maintenance. New tires, battery, and belts is a nice plus as well. I just ordered new tires and a set of belts (I’ll install myself) and that cost about $700 in parts so you’re saving a bit there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I had considered a VFR as well. They are legendary for reliability, comfort and smoothness. The Monster looks to be in nice shape and it sounds like the owner stayed on top of the maintenance. New tires, battery, and belts is a nice plus as well. I just ordered new tires and a set of belts (I’ll install myself) and that cost about $700 in parts so you’re saving a bit there.
Good points there CGYrider
 

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Good points there CGYrider
Thanks Munter, though I hope I don't come across as any sort of expert, as I'm just getting familiarized with Monster ownership myself. Other things you may want to consider are things like maintenance requirements. If you plan to do some or most of the service work on the bike yourself, you'll need to make allowances both in terms of time and cost. Or you may wish to defer that to a shop, provided that one is close and reputable. I've just started to aggregate some of the tools I'll need for my specific Monster, and there are a few specialty items that are needed. Not terribly difficult to find or overly expensive, but nontheless it's worth researching and then considering before buying a bike such as these. I think this is the case (in general) for any motorcycle, but Ducati's have a few more more specialized service and equipment requirements than most mainstream bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Once more, a thank you, CGYrider.

I like to do as much as I can myself....have changed oil and filter twice, fitted a K&N airfilter, Bitubo rear shocks, Dart screen and throttle spacers to the Street Twin myself but I like to know my limits....I dont want to fux anything!

Can you tell me some of the specific tools for Ducati maintenance, please?

I am still not at the seeing, touching, checking, sitting on, riding stage here yet as I am far from most listings, have a medical appointment I must not miss and it has been raining for the last three days with more to come....but plans are being formulated and submitted to the permission committee.
 

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Yeah of course, no problem Munter.
I’m sort of in the beginning stages of aggregating my own set of Ducati tools.
Now, your specific tools may be different, for whichever model you end up buying, but these are the ones that seem popular for DIY Ducati ownership.

I’m sure other members here could add more knowledgeable information, but I think these are sort of the main specialty tools specific to my Monster 1200.

Some are also common to other Ducati service routines. I also know that a lot of people will make some of their own tooling or adapt a tool they have to make it work for a certain task. I do this alot.

-55mm, 12 point socket for rear wheel removal
-30mm, for front wheel (not that special, TBH)
-Crankshaft rotating tool and/or crankshaft TDC locking tool (not sure if I need to lock it at TDC, but seems to be a handy feature)
-Chain tensioner tool
-Camshaft tool to lock the cam sprockets in position

I think I’m just scratching the “service” here,(yes, terrible pun intended 😀), but I found a site online that rents Ducati tools and provides good explanations as to what tool is used where. It was helpful for me, as at least I can get a sense of what’s involved in the servicing and what tools are needed.
Here is the link:

 

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Sounds to me like you have it pretty well sorted. Definitely get a monster, you won’t regret it. My 797 makes me pretty happy and it’s a keeper. Honestly, they are all great in their own regard. Pick the one that makes you happy and fits your needs.
 

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A lot of great choices out there. I too didn't ride for 30 + years and about a year and a half ago bought a dual sport (2009 F650 GS) to see if I liked it and could get my wife to ride along. I did and she did. I also bough a 2016 900 Triumph Street Scrambler and for the look and to buzz around town with. Loved the torque and sound and figured I would then upgrade my GS to a 1200 and put the BMW on craigslist for a bit more of it than I paid and it sold in days. While searching a few days later I ran across a 95 900M and fell in love with the look, the rawness and sound. I am a bit taller and heavier but will say that it is a bike that I will keep forever. Love the simplicity of the old carb twins, and my mechanic says that is one of the best engines.

No bad choices...here is a pic of the current stable.

Wheel Tire Land vehicle Fuel tank Vehicle
 

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Kia ora from New Zealand.

Greetings to the forum members wherever you may be in the world.

Thirteen months ago the petrol in my veins rose to the surface and I bought a 2016 Triumph Street twin.
This was after no riding for forty years, yes forty years, I am 68 years old.
Now after 9000kms and thirteen months I am yearning to try a Ducati.

In years past (distant past) I have owned a K1 Honda 750 four and a Yamaha 650 XS2 before turning to trials riding.

I am looking for some advice from the knowledgeable members here about what model might be best for me.
I am 5'6" 165cm and weigh 70kgs.
I am liking the look of the 821 but should I consider the 796? or something else? maybe the Monster1100?

My Triumph is 900cc with a modest HP rating but strong torque so I have ruled out the 659 engined bikes.

Any thoughts, opinions, comments are welcome.

Thanks in advance

Regards
John
John, No matter what you ride please consider taking a motorcycle safety course. Not a course that teaches you how to write a motorcycle, you know how to do that but a course that helps you be safer on the street. Here in the US the returning rider 40+ returning rider is more at risk than all other age groups to die in a motorcycle crash.

This world has changed alot in 40 years. I am also 68 and have been consistantly riding for 50+ years 3-400,000 miles. I take safety courses often, i do not want to die in a mc crash!

For the sake of survival, consider committing to life long learning for safety. As we age, our reaction times slow, my plan it to make up for that with better skill.

Lets have fun!
 

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Kia ora from New Zealand.

Greetings to the forum members wherever you may be in the world.

Thirteen months ago the petrol in my veins rose to the surface and I bought a 2016 Triumph Street twin.
This was after no riding for forty years, yes forty years, I am 68 years old.
Now after 9000kms and thirteen months I am yearning to try a Ducati.

In years past (distant past) I have owned a K1 Honda 750 four and a Yamaha 650 XS2 before turning to trials riding.

I am looking for some advice from the knowledgeable members here about what model might be best for me.
I am 5'6" 165cm and weigh 70kgs.
I am liking the look of the 821 but should I consider the 796? or something else? maybe the Monster1100?

My Triumph is 900cc with a modest HP rating but strong torque so I have ruled out the 659 engined bikes.

Any thoughts, opinions, comments are welcome.

Thanks in advance

Regards
John
821 or 1200 would suit you well. Take one for a ride. Beautifully balanced, nice power without being intimidating. Low seat height. A lot more interesting than your Triumph. Buy one and enjoy.
 
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