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Hi all, I think many of us have gotten used to their Ducati rear brakes being - to be kind, "less than effective". Been through the usual caliper upside down, mityvac, etc with my Ducati level 2 tech, but without good results. Does anyone know if this has been addressed lately? Have seen opinions about brake lines being a possible weak link. I'm usually good with front brake only, but on a steep on-ramp stoplight a rear could be handy. What say you?
 

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I think we’ll have to accept the rear brake just sucks. For the stopping power it has, Ducati could have saved money and only installed brakes on the front.
 

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I have a ’96 SS and a ‘07 S4RS. Both have stainless rear lines and EBC HH pads.
I would grade the rear brakes on both as adequate. I use the rear brakes on gravel roads, down hill stops, and in wet weather. The only problem I’ve ever had with either is a squealing brake on the SS, cured by the EBC pads.
I have bled the fluid with the caliper mounted and also with the bleeder pointed upward.
The pedal feel on both is a bit sponging than I would like.
I clean and deglaze the rotor with a vibratory sander whenever I have the rear wheel off .
Do I wish the rear brake was better ? Yes, but it performs its function. I’m used to it.
 

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Mine works well. I think some models (maybe not monsters) there is an issue of where the rear lines are run and they get too hot. In general I believe that you need to be perfect when you bleed them. A vacuum tool works best and is almost needed is what I have read.

Rex
 

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If you mean ABS models, yes, weak as. Tried all sorts. Best success was bleeding at the ABS unit. (1100 Evo ABS) No nipple, so messy, but the rear has worked ever since, where before it would deteriorate in the two months after bleeding.
 

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If your bike has ABS install a banjo bolt on the ABS module or use a 200ml syringe and push fluid with constant pressure from the master cylinder to get rid of all the bubbles.

If you don't want to have do repeat the task every 3 month, put some Castrol SRF fluid (highest wet boiling point).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Now this sounds like we're possibly getting somewhere. alancsalt, could you elaborate on the messy procedure?
Similar bike M796 abs... If you screw up, would this affect abs on front brakes?
 

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I think only bled junctions for rear? It's been a while. You just loosen, apply pedal, let bleed, tighten, release pedal, until no air... then clean mess away. had rag and tissues there, but still some mess.
 

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One thing I forgot to mention, I do use a vacuum bleeder at first, then I do it the conventional way by hand after that because you can’t always tell where the bubbles are coming from using vacuum. I wrap bleeder with Teflon tape and wire tie the tubing to it to avoid pulling air from outside.
 

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I have a 2018 1200R and had completely given up on the rear brake as I hardly ever use it but, as you mentioned, it comes in handy on steep ramps (and stop lights, etc). I bled it myself a couple of times and it degraded quickly so it was generally shitty but at some point I got zero brake and was just tired of it so I finally took it to the dealership. The Service guy said in some cases the brake lines were being recalled so we went through the steps: they checked the bike and bled the brake themselves and after it degraded (immediately) they put in a warranty ticket for the lines. It took forever, because of course it always takes forever to do anything service-related at the dealership and because stuff got messed up with the pandemic, etc, but I got my bike back a couple of weeks ago with new brake lines and so far it seems like I have a rear brake, which is pretty surprising.

I was told the original brake lines only have one crimping point, and the new ones have two. I interpret this as air is seeping in through the lines, which does not make a lot of sense to me because I would think that with the pressure when one applies the brake then we should see some leaks, however small, yet I never had any.
Happy now, I guess I will see how it goes.
 

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Hi all, I think many of us have gotten used to their Ducati rear brakes being - to be kind, "less than effective". Been through the usual caliper upside down, mityvac, etc with my Ducati level 2 tech, but without good results. Does anyone know if this has been addressed lately? Have seen opinions about brake lines being a possible weak link. I'm usually good with front brake only, but on a steep on-ramp stoplight a rear could be handy. What say you?
 

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There is a recall on some rear brake lines. The fittings used on the original ones on my 2018 M821 would allow air into the system. The lines have now been replaced under warranty at 9400 miles. Front lines show the same issue, only much earlier.
 

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I’m not understanding what the problem is. I invert the rear caliper to bleed. Use motule 600 / 660 - bleed with rear brake peddle - 3 full reservoirs.. I have absolutely no issues - brake fees good - sometimes I accidentally even lock it up on stops..
 

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I have stainless braided brake and clutch lines on all my bikes. Maybe that’s part of the reason I get better results bleeding the brakes ?
 

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I have stainless braided brake and clutch lines on all my bikes. Maybe that’s part of the reason I get better results bleeding the brakes ?
Ducati already uses braided clutch/brake lines even on entry level motorcycle. It's a common upgrade only on Japanese bikes which often come with simple rubber brake lines.
 

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I think the main problem on later models is the rear brake reservoir is way too close to the cats or exhaust routing. Heat causes fluid to boil (maybe) and air gets in to the system. These high exhaust systems cook more than your leg.
As mentioned, the models with ABS can get air trapped and need bleeding at the ABS unit.

Fixes range from using very high temp fluid as the racers use.
If you don't want to have do repeat the task every 3 month, put some Castrol SRF fluid (highest wet boiling point).
Another thing I've seen is heat shields for the reservoir. You would need to search for them as I don't know who makes them or if they even work. Just an idea.

224645
 

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Hi all, I think many of us have gotten used to their Ducati rear brakes being - to be kind, "less than effective". Been through the usual caliper upside down, mityvac, etc with my Ducati level 2 tech, but without good results. Does anyone know if this has been addressed lately? Have seen opinions about brake lines being a possible weak link. I'm usually good with front brake only, but on a steep on-ramp stoplight a rear could be handy. What say you?
I struggled for hours to bleed the rear brake on my M900 until I figured out that I need to remove the calliper, invert it and then lift it to a height above or level to the master cylinder. Only then was all the air pushed out during the bleed and the brake became hard and solid. The amound of fluid travel is not enough to move air bubbles around the downward bend of the brake line while in the installed position and therefor the brakes remain spongy! Hope this helps.
 

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I think the heat shield is a great idea. If anyone knows a source, please post it here.
As far as making heat shields yourself, race car parts suppliers like Summit have different types of heat barrier materials available. My view is any heat reduction will help. Also , even if you don’t want to spend the big money, pay attention to the heat rating of the brake fluid you buy. It isn’t necessary to spend a fortune to get a fluid with very good temperature resistance. Just shop around .
Another option if you are serious about heat reduction is to get your exhaust JetHot coated in and out, which reduces radiated heat and will even give a performance increase.
If you don’t mind the look you can wrap your exhaust pipes. That definitely reduces radiated heat from the exhaust.
 
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