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Does anyone know how tough it is to be sponsored and all that jazz to ride and race for a living??
 

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nomonster said:
Does anyone know how tough it is to be sponsored and all that jazz to ride and race for a living??
It's not tough at all! It's a _sweet_ life! Swanning around the world from racetrack to fashion opening with barely a few weeks in between to spend cavorting on your yacht in San Marino with your super model girlfriend - it's hard work at times, but it's _far_ from tough!

;-)

big (unless you meant _getting_ there, and yeah, _thats_ tough...)
 

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you know, i've been curious how one goes about getting into racing... without having an absolute ****-ton of money to work through privateering, until you get good and sponsered, or get broke.

or, uh... is that pretty much the one and only way to do this?
 

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I guess your best bet would be to do well in the grass roots league.. If you do well on a cheaper budget, and you provide a business plan to sponsors they will take interest. You do well and you'll get more sponsors.. it's pretty much all dependent I would think on how well you can ride. Ride fast, win races, gain sponsorship, obtain higher levels of racing.
 

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<edit/ to be pro riding racing for a living>you'll only need one thing, talent. And lots of it. Money to get started doesn't hurt either.

A lot of the really fast guys have been riding and or racing since they were very young. A lot of the fast guys in our local racing org are kids or they have been racing since their were kids, (16,17 18 yrs old) Look at Moto Gp, the 125, 250 riders are majority less than 20 and i think pedrosa is only 20.

For sponsorships, if your fast, they will come. Some people get sponsored because they know a friend that owns a business, or they know the right people, or they own business and Spenser themselves as a tax write off. Others get sponsored by the company they work for. There is a local guy i know that is sponsored by his work cause his boss likes bikes.

There is also contingency programs, for example if you race with dunlop tires and you finish top 3 in the race, dunlop will pay you a few bucks $$$. Other companies will give you a racers discount if you put stickers on your bike and fill out some paper work for them.

Sponsorship=advertising so it doesn't hurt to ask around
 

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DanTheMan said:
A lot of the really fast guys have been riding and or racing since they were very young. A lot of the fast guys in our local racing org are kids or they have been racing since their were kids, (16,17 18 yrs old) Look at Moto Gp, the 125, 250 riders are majority less than 20 and i think pedrosa is only 20.
when it comes to "starting young", 16-18 is not "kids" territory. duhamel, spies, etc started racing <8yo.
 

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i knew you would stop by and correct me...

i ment they are 16, 17, 18 now, but they been at is since 4,5,6 yrs old
 

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DanTheMan said:
i knew you would stop by and correct me...

i ment they are 16, 17, 18 now, but they been at is since 4,5,6 yrs old
[thumbsup]
 

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I agree with the "win" comment. Even if you're 35 years old and overweight, but manage to win every single race you enter, I'm sure someone somewhere will take notice.

I think that goes for all professional sports. No one cares who you are or where you're from--if you can throw 95 miles an hour, you'll find a job.

So git winnin' boy.
 

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derby said:
when it comes to "starting young", 16-18 is not "kids" territory. duhamel, spies, Coastie's boys, etc started racing <8yo.

Fixed it for ya. ;D
 

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you need to be fast and you need to have a **** load of income ie; need to be able to afford several bikes, parts for both bikes, a tech to work on them because as a racer the last thing you want to do is worry about your bike when you come in from practice or qualafying and have to work on your own bike and then go back out for another session plus its hard to do your own work when you have to run around to racers meetings and such. traveling with all of this equipment isnt cheap either. tires will run you inexcess of $400+ per race (unless you doing eight lap sprint races which aint **** if you want to go pro) the list goes on but good luck.
 

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How to make a small fortune racing....

first, start with a large fortune....
 

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joydivision said:
I agree with the "win" comment. Even if you're 35 years old and overweight, but manage to win every single race you enter, I'm sure someone somewhere will take notice.

I think that goes for all professional sports. No one cares who you are or where you're from--if you can throw 95 miles an hour, you'll find a job.

So git winnin' boy.
If you want to make a living doing this then you better be about 18 years old. You can get some sponsors, but until you are on a factory team or a factory supported team, you aren't making enough money to live off of (there are of course a notable FEW exceptions). If you're 35 no team is going to hire you, it's just not a good investment. And, even if you're winning your sponsors are only providing oil, bodywork, brakes, etc. and a few contingency dollars, nothing special. You'll still be paying for your bikes, leathers, possibly tires (depending on what brand you wanna race). In other words, it's very dificult racket and very few have the talent and the motivation and marketability in order to be successful....
 

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take a look at danny eslick. seems like he just popped up but he's been at this for many years. or josh herrin... 16 yrs old, out there giving the veterans a run for their money. and he just got a factory ride. jeesh.

also you have to think like this: http://www.superbikeplanet.com/2006/Oct/061019b.htm
 

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gm2 said:
take a look at danny eslick. seems like he just popped up but he's been at this for many years. or josh herrin... 16 yrs old, out there giving the veterans a run for their money. and he just got a factory ride. jeesh.

also you have to think like this: http://www.superbikeplanet.com/2006/Oct/061019b.htm
[thumbsup]

sconly said:
you need to be fast and you need to have a **** load of income ie; need to be able to afford several bikes, parts for both bikes, a tech to work on them because as a racer the last thing you want to do is worry about your bike when you come in from practice or qualafying and have to work on your own bike and then go back out for another session plus its hard to do your own work when you have to run around to racers meetings and such. traveling with all of this equipment isnt cheap either. tires will run you inexcess of $400+ per race (unless you doing eight lap sprint races which aint **** if you want to go pro) the list goes on but good luck.

"racers meetings" are once in the morning and dont' require a lot of running around.

also, spies started out doing regional "eight lap sprints" on a single set of tires a day. he also used to run a longer format race that was, i believe, 16 laps. in the longer race, he used to beat guys on "big bikes" with his 250gp bike (or was it his 125... i can't remember).

by the time he turned 16, ben had been noticed for quite some time and john ulrich hooked him up with a gsx-r600 to clubrace with until he was old enough to race AMA. the rest, well, you've seen on TV.

if you have the talent, you just have to make sure you get noticed. that doesn't mean spend crazy money on A and B bike, and a transporter, a top mechanic and all that. the assistance will usually come with time. there are people at the track that love to cultivate talent. everybody wants to find the next lawson, rainey, spencer, shwantz, edwards, spies, and kozinski.

but you DO have to get noticed. that usually means local competitiveness , competitiveness at the wera GNF on the east coast, competitiveness at the WSMC local races, or WSMC's one off "Toyota 200". there are other orgs and regions, but WERA is the largest and WSMC is the closest to the US headquarters for all the Japanese motorcycle manufacturers... it's motorcycle country.
 
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