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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After pulling the suspected bad fuel pump from my '00 M900ie, I applied 12v directly to it while on the bench and got no response. No startup (priming?) noise, no indication that it's alive. Should I take this as confirmation that it's dead?

If so, does anyone know of any sources where I can try to find one at less than OEM$ ? Used is fine as long as it arrives alive. I have always bought my parts from the dealer in the past, but this one's $200 and I can't afford it (unemployed for 1 year +).

I'll appreciate any advice offered.
Thanks!
 
G

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I've tested these pumps extensively and there is not much to go bad with them. I'd check and make sure the impeller is not in a bind before I trashed it.....try reverse polarity on the voltage (its a DC motor you are not going to hurt anything).
BTW: I've never found another source for these. I even talked to Bosch corporate when I was testing these pumps for research purposes. Bosch corporate told me the pumps were made to Ducati spec (although the intake and supply scheme was all they ever changed).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Believe me when I say I'm not excited about the probability of having to replace it. But I put reverse polarity on it and nothing happened. I see the micro-sparks from the contact of the wires, but no go. When I blow through it at the point of the pre-filter, the air just comes out of a little pin hole (designed to be there) right next to it. I looked for a way to take it apart, but maybe I need to look a little closer.

Also meaningless but interesting to note, is that the Ducati name molded into the rubber casing is the historical logo. It's the one Ducati used back in the 60's/70's.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Ok. TripleDuck was absolutely right. The impeller was in a bind. I used a nail through the intake to spin the impeller until it was fairly free wheeling. Applying power would cause it to move a little but stop again. So I shot some goof-off into it and began to work it much better. Some very nasty stuff came out of it for a long time. Dark brown with minute chunks of something black. It's working pretty well but it doesn't run smoothly. It'll slow down after a bit and eventually bind again. A quick reversal in polarity and all is well again for a minute. So although it seems like it has issues, it does seem like it should eventually be ok.

I'm wondering if there's something I can use to finish dissolving whatever is in there. Maybe something I can soak it in?

And the big question I have is regarding the short sound we hear when we turn the key in the ignition. I always assumed it was the fuel pump but I don't think it is now that I know what it sounds like. Since I don't hear that sound when power is applied to the bike, I obviously have more wrong than I thought.

As always, I'm thankful for any help....
 

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Hmmm... I'd be pretty nervous about putting that pump back in the bike. I mean, whatever caused it to bind up the first time is still an issue. If what you had was crud or varnish from bad fuel or a missing filter, then cleaning it out and reinstalling might work out, but if the problem is bad bearings (more likely IMO) then you can only fix it temporarily with cleaning/relubing.

If cost is a concern, I think I'd be more confident buying a used pump off of a wreck or something and using that.

The noise when you first turn it on IS the fuel pump; it runs long enough to pressurize the lines and then stops until the engine is started. It sounds very different on the bike because it's inside the tank, probably immersed in fuel, and also pumping fuel rather than nothing. If you put your head down next to the tank while it's running, you can hear the same noise as the pump then runs continuously.

M.
 
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