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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Yep, lots of questions today people....

I've read just about every post I can about the high speed wobble, twitchiness of monsters at higher speeds.
 

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I've got non-adjustable Showas on my 95 M900. I've got 17 mm above the top of the clamp to the top edge of the fork cap. The rear arch still has the adjusters screwed all the way in.

However, I just received some adjustable Showas from a 900SS today ;D , and it looks like the adjusters may not clear the handlebars. I'm wondering if I have to raise the triple clamps on the forks, will raising the rear by the corresponding amount keep my geometry good (while also giving me a few more mm of clearance). This may give us what we need to get everything dialed in at both ends - I hope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well,
I measure my height about the clamp, it is about 22 mm...So maybe it isn't that off....I'm not too sure. It just seems as if the geometry may be a bit off...I mean, I can twitch the bars back and forth going down the road withouth hardly even trying...

My rear wishbone is showing about 3 threads. I'm just trying to make sure it's at least stock before I get crazy trying to fix the problem...

Thanks
 
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High speed straight line wobble or wallowing in turns?
What are you experiencing and on what bike and forks?
How fast are you going?
The thing is it can be a number of things but it can be cured and
yep some of that cure depends on how you want to ride....
 

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The stock measurement for the '97 Monster is 3/4" of fork tube showing above the triple clamp.

Raising the rear will likely give you less high speed stability.

The tires also affect high speed wobble. A BT010 front gave some high speed wobble on two different Monsters I've ridden, one with a steering damper and one without. Switching to a BT020 totally eliminated the wobble.

If my bike had had a steering damper a couple of weeks ago, I probably would not be typing this with one hand and wondering what to get for my next bike. Adding a steering damper to a Monster just might save you someday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
High speed straight line wobble or wallowing in turns?
What are you experiencing and on what bike and forks?
How fast are you going?
The thing is it can be a number of things but it can be cured and
yep some of that cure depends on how you want to ride....
Retro,
Mostly a wallowing in turns, I can deal with a little wobble in the straight once in a while. Speeds, typically about 70, on country roads. Stock show forks on a 2001 monster. No mods to suspension just a sargent saddle, which seems to be a bit taller 1/2" or so. Running, Michelin Pilot sports...came stock with these.

Thanks for any help
 
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....if wallowing on pretty much a stock monster I would suspect your rear......particularily the shock spring pre load and rear height. to adjust the rear spring I would suggest getting a hammer and a brass rod that is long enough to reach into the shock collars and fits inside the collar cut outs.... mark the original collars position with a sharpie loosen the top one and turn the bottom one two turns tighter and cinch em up again and ride and check...the shaprie marks lets you count the turns and lines the cinching back up...if you got a tie rod rear end you can get a SBK take off that is adjustable or buy an aftermarket one to get the rear up some....all the raise the rear, lower the front, get clip on suggestions are to get more weight over the front and lead with the head....sport instead of cruise....
I assume your sag is set!....don't let the confusion get you down at all.....the rewards will be a bike that handles really well....cheers
and just in case.....
http://www.ohlins.com/mc_manuals.shtml
 
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another thought......looking at Scott's post reminds me that
there is no stock position really everyone rides different and all that affects everyone's experience.....I'm on BT010's now and I have had the bike speedo pinned, nothing but great tracking and that is taking sweepers over 120......so what I am trying to say
is while he had bad results I am getting great results, same with suspension set up....I have never had any instabilty raising my rear or lowering my front and I have a lot of fork through the yokes.....just goes to show how it is different for everyone.....I guess the point I am trying to make is that it is pretty specific to your bike and you. I have seen the rear too high too so that the chain wears the chain plate away on the swingarm....you know what I'm saying...
 
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Had my 96 m900 at the track forks are 25mm above clamp and rear is up about 5 threads. I have a steering damper which is real crappy (the local shop thought I got it off a screen door), and I had no problems at all. I did put on a set of Pirrelli's and that may be the difference. Also I noticed that after the tires were installed and new sprokets were put on the chain was on the short sided so my wheelbase was even shorter, so my handling should have been even more twitchy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Retro and splinter, thanks for the advice.

Set the static sag front and rear...only 32mm in the front because the springs are so soft, I have only one line showing from max on the forks. The rear static sag is set at 30mm I had a bit more play there. I haven't messed with the compression or rebound yet, nor the ride height. I'll have to take it out this weekend to a good bit of twisty road and fiddle with it to see if I can tune out the high speed wallowing when I'm in a curve....it's really a detracter from rider confidence that is for sure.


I will let you know how it works out.

PS...can I crank the forks down to max and not have an adverse effect on the handling? I know static sag should be the same front and back
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Re: Fork Height above the Triple Clamp: Update

Okay guys,
Received some help here, now after todays ride I'm left even more perplexed than ever.
 
G

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Hi Chuck, don't give up.... the stand nub should go, grind 'er off...common to start dragging hard bits...you will have to raise the rear a little and possibly get rear sets, etc. none of which is uncommon for aggressive riding.

Where are you located?
 
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If you have your sag set then I would work on the damping.
It sounds like you have plenty of damping adjustment left, and the rear height is still stock.
If it were me I would raise the rear, and start clicking the compression damping clockwise. Front and rear. Keep track in a notebook.
No reason to give up, it is not uncommon to sort out the suspension when riding aggressively. A friend of mine just bought an R6, you should read the post on his woes....
I guess I am trying to say there are apparently, (reading your post), plenty of options available yet to remedy your bikes handling, with the stock components.
If you know someone in your area to check things so much the better. A good guy can sit on your bike and compress the forks, bounce up and down, and tell a lot just from that. My experience with monsters thinks your situation is not that uncommon. Sometimes compliant can also be confused with too soft. Have you put a zip tie on your fork tube to check travel by the way?
 
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I believe there is a Ohlins in Hendersonville N.C. maybe someone there could assist you? Maybe start a N.C post here seeking help locally.
I know there are some good people here from N.C..
The zip tie is a good way to check travel, just cinch one around your fork tube on the upper half of the tube. when you are done riding check where it is. Ideally you want to be using almost all the travel. you will know by seeing were the tie ends up how much you are using. If it bottoms out you will have a good visual of too soft.
Remember as frustrating as this is you will get there, and you will have learned a lot. So the next bike will be much easier to figure out.
Keep asking questions and using all your adjustements and see if you can't improve things. Figuring out suspension goes hand and hand with becoming a better rider I think, or as you become a better rider, suspension will become more and more prevelant.
 
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I'm bumping this up as I had said rebound when I meant to say compression. I adjusted the previous post. Sorry.
After thinking about your post I think too soft is prolly right....springs and or compression damping. So you can at least try the compression damping and check travel too see if you are bottoming out. I hope that should get you pretty well sorted.
 

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I have a 97 M900 with non-adjustable forks. When I first got the bike it had the same problem in corners that you are experiencing. Scary as all hell. Last winter I put in a stiffer set of springs (matched to my weight and use) and a set of gold valves from Race Tech. It still is a little soft for the track (that I have only been on once) but no more problems on the street. The bike tracks great now.

So, I whole heartily agree with the previous post. Things are still too mushy down in front. You still have to mess with the spring and the dampening. The stock spring rate, even dialed in all the way, might still be too soft for your weight and riding style. Be prepared for the possibility of upgrading the spring. Once you get the handle on this bull, the bike will perform predictably.

fc
 
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