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Hi guys/gals.

Looked at a bike with hi exhausts and a jet kit. Start up procedure was a little different. No throttle, hit starter and ease on choke as she cranked. Started right up and idled just fine! Owner said not to give any throttle as it would kill it and make it difficult to start. Was wondering if these are a little picky with jet kits and such. Maybe it's not dialed right in or something. Really like the bike but this has me wondering. Bike did start right up twice after a good test ride. Temp was pretty cool last night so bike was pretty cold when first started. Be interested in knowing what everyone's start up procedure is.

Thanks!
 

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On cold mornings, crank the choke before starting. Sure fire starts. On warm days or after riding earlier that day, the choke is not necessary, just bringing up the RPM gently.
 

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For my 1997 M900: if it's cold and hasn't been started for a few days, put the choke full on, don't touch the throttle until the rpms rise past 2000, and don't crank for more than about five seconds if it's not ready to start right up. When it's been sitting in the cold for a long time, it often takes three or four "hits" on the starter button before it gets going.

On mine, even before installation of the jet kit, if you touched the throttle before the rise in rpms, it would definitely kill it and make it harder to restart. However, once running cleanly for 20-30 seconds, it's generally happy and I can turn the choke off and ride away.

I have no idea why you would want to gradually put the choke on while cranking. I've always put it full on before hitting the starter button.
 
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maybe the gradual thing with the choke is his habbit.
when its warmer he might use partial choke or something.
 

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If the bike hasn't been started that day or for longer, choke to two thirds (warm ambient air) to full on (cold ambient air) and hit the starter; she fires right off. Do not touch throttle (floods at the drop of a hat). As the rpms rise, ease the choke off a little until the rpms settle to what is a little higher than normal but not too high (boy I want one of those tacho meter thingies). I have found (the hard way) that cracking the throttle prior to or while thumbing the starter will cause the engine to flood.

On cold days I let the engine warm for a full five minutes before taking off. On warm days I find I can turn the choke off within a minute or two of starting and warm the engine for a few minutes total and she's ready to go.
 
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