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Well, it happened. thought it never would. I over heated a corner, couldn't scrub off speed and lean at the same time. Probably due to my neophyte status, I don't even think I make "squid" yet.

It was a miracle in action: got off at about 40 mph, hit soft dirt, don't know what happened next. NO carbon fiber damage ( my bike has all the foggy goodies). Broke the rearset, between that and the frame sliders, the bike came through just getting dirty. I was even able to limp home, wash the bike, AND THE WIFE DOESN'T KNOW!

God works in wonderful ways. I just have a sore body, nothing broken. Time to review where we go from here. Time to set limits to the adrenalin.

Regards,
Rideon
 
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I would say that you're lucky but instead I'm glad to hear you're OK. Get some rest and eat good food. You'll be allright. I bet you're glad you had those frame sliders!
 

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Can't believe you didn't dent your tank. Don't get me wrong I'm glad you didn't... but usually... Good luck, and practice leaning and braking at the same time. Monsters don't stand up to bad under trail braking.
 

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Glad you are ok and that the bike is relatively in very good shape - but how the hell did you not dent the tank? Did the bar end not dig in anywhere?

Now don't get drunk and let the accident info slip to the wife.
 

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A get-off without major injury to yourself and what sounds like only minor damage to the bike--the Fates were in your favor, for sure. Major learning opportunity with only minor pain, a great combination! Hope your aches and pains dissipate quickly and that you get out there again soon.
 

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While you're in the frame of mind to try to figure out how to keep from doing that again, it would be a good time to buy Proficient Motorcycling by David L. Hough and read the whole book. He proposes a late apex technique where you do your braking before turning, go wide coming into the turn, then hit the apex and power out of the corner.

When I switched the way I choose my lines I completely stopped going wide in corners and almost never have "panic reactions" anymore. I've seen the concept explained by many different people, but Mr. Hough was the first one to explain it logically enough for me to believe it would improve things, and it has made a big difference. And unlike what some people seem to think, I can actually go faster this way and with more confidence. It's not the right way for a race track, but it seems to be the best for the street.
 

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While you're in the frame of mind to try to figure out how to keep from doing that again, it would be a good time to buy Proficient Motorcycling by David L. Hough and read the whole book.
 

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You know I read it as well - multiple times-, but we have those days. It is the inherent problem with having little room for error. You need to know what to do, what happened and what to do different next time.

My last incident was on a typical ride to work a few weeks ago. I came to a sharp left hand bend off a brief highway stretch. I was a tad too hot for the corner having passed a car. Braked hard knowing I still had the room if I pushed it and downshifted for the corner. But I was so focused on getting the speed down I clicked down 2 gears. Only needed one for the speed I was going to carry. I knew it happened but in the whole mess I was not in a position to upshift quickly. I needed power in the corner to ease the weight distribution so the front did not wash. When I dropped the clutch the rear locked up despite a generous throttle input - I was already starting my lean. I felt like Troy Bayliss with the rear hanging out. Now I really had an imbalance going at the bike looked for traction. I had armco (on a bridge) to look forward to kissing. Fortunately, this is how I entered just about every corner as a kid on my dirtbike. I also recalled my various texts. I was already hard on the gas and resisted the temptation to get off the gas. I slid the bike around the first half of the corner until it set and launched me out the exit. Luckily the rear did not throw me when it caught. That week I re-read all my bed side reading materials to make sure I did what I was suppose to.

Drove to work the next day and the day after that. I was careful with my downshifts.

My only advice is you NEED to know or figure out what you did and plan for the next time because it will happen.
 

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Glad you and the bike are okay.
Agreed on the proficient MC book by Hough. Plus a few others I keep next to the loo, found here:
http://www.whitehorsepress.com/onlinecatalog/sections/section.asp?id=skills

Books by Lee Parks, Nick Lenatsh, and Keith Code. I like Lee Park's book for the street, it includes good skills to train.

When entering corners too hot, although my body/brain want's to keep it stood up and run off the outside while braking, I'll force the opposite and lean harder. It has saved my hide a few times and I haven't lowsided yet. Point being that your Duc will turn harder and tires grip better than you think! Just don't try it in sand....

Good luck with getting the bike sorted out.
-JC
 
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Glad to hear you are okay it sounds like it could have been much worse.........
 

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I think I am heading for the book store as well. What were you wearing for leathers and what frame sliders were you using, sounds like they both worked well!
 

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On the topic of reading, I'd also like to recommend Sport Riding Techniques: How To Develop Real World Skills for Speed, Safety, and Confidence on the Street and Track By Nick Ienatsch.

I've read and recommend Hough, Parks, and Code as well, but I think the actual writing is better in Nick's book (particularly better than Code) and it's kind of a shorter, "get to the point" reference book that covers much of what's in the other books as well. You can easily read the whole book in two evenings, and when the weekend comes around you can go back review and practice the information in the book on a chapter by chapter basis.

It's also got lots of pretty pictures... ;D

--Fillmore
 

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Wow, a three and a half year old thread. ::)

Glad you were ok all those years ago....






[cheeky]
 
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