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Discussion Starter #1
based on previous adventures, not related to motorcycling, I have learned there is a magical order to figuring out high stress situations quickly and accurately, like going into a corner at a high rate of speed on the street.

Does anyone know what the order of events are, or know of a book that would have said order, and what to do? Keith code has the components but so far has not mentioned an order, and a solution list. Again, he has it in peicmeal form, which is maybe as good as it gets.

Any comments? Constructive ones?

Regards,
Rideon
 
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Code's comments are about spot on. I've heard of other "riding technique" books, but, some things can't be learned from books. So I'd say, "Grip It, and Rip It". No substitute for experience.
 

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Just bought Code's 'Soft Science' book. Cracked it open just enough at Borders to figure it was worth the $20.

If I'm approaching a corner at a speed obviously higher than what I can make it at, I try to inspect the corner as much as I can, determine how much speed I need to scrub off, and then commence doing that. Usually by the time you've got that almost done, you can see more of the corner, and can adjust whether you need to slow down more, or can initiate the turn-in.

Not sure if that's on-topic to your question...or were you thinking more along the lines of 'Oh Sh!t..I'm coming in way too hot!'?
 

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There is a great book called Proficient Motorcycling by Hough, in it is a sequential mantra for cornering : Slow, Look, Lean and Roll (on the throttle). Is that what you were asking?
 

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I have the MORE proficient motorcycling book... there's some info in there regarding doing the ride route with fun but also with awareness that keeps your wheels on the tarmac...

basically, if you're approaching a blind turn (lots of those in California), adjust your approach speed to take into account the parked pick-up truck (or whatever you want to put there) that's in the middle of the road. That actually happened on one of our local rides... glad no one got rear ended. (reminds me of those squid videos of stoppie crashes)
 
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If I come in too hot...ummm....after saying "oh thit" I cut my eyes into the inside of the turn and lean like a motherhumper....rather slide out than target-fixate into a wide sweep into the on-coming lane or the scenery. Counter-intuitive but you can force yourself to learn it.

A lot has been written about target-fixation, if you are unfamiliar read up on it, might save you your life or some major hospital invoices

Target-fixation will get you in a world of trouble. Grabbing a handful of
 

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After I adjusted to the style recommended by Hough in Proficient Motorcycling, I no longer find myself coming into corners too hot. If you want to learn the quickest way to get round in the real world (as opposed to the race track), read Hough's book.

By quickest in the real world, that includes not having to pick your bike up off of the side of the road because you've reduced your odds of crashing due to unforseen circumstances.
 

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I think that the monster has actually made me better at cornering.
I find my clutch rather 'grabby' so I have been more focused on achieving the correct entry speed on Gina then say the 929 which is more forgiving...I tend to be too conservative on blind corners, but in Northern Virginia on the country twisties I've come upon many instances of road gravel, deers jumping out etc. that I like to know what I'm getting into,
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the replies. I am reading and rereading sentences in Codes book and it is starting to make sense. For instance, he states that camber is the most important factor. Then radius. I was thinking the mantra could be : camber,radius, new focal point, camber radius, and the appropriate throttle response for each new situation and radius change.

I know somewhere there is a mental order of things I can memorize, commit to my brain stem, and function well, and go very fast safely. I was wondering if someone knew a source.

Regards,
Rideon
 

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I'm hoping Retro will weigh in here, he's well read, thorough, and quick.

Code's book that I got is seeming a little abstract so far, but I'm not far into it.
 

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i remember the "slow, look, lean, and roll" thing from my MSF course 5 years ago. on our final run for the range grade the instructor would yell out RRROOOOOOOLLLLLLLLLLL so loud in the middle of the corner i'd get the crap scared out of me.
 

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I bought Ienatsch's book. Lots of good general info, IMO. Talks about inputs (handlebar, body position, wieght on pegs, etc.), using traction for braking vs. turning, etc.

Reading it made me think a lot about turning in LATER instead of earlier. Made even more sense on a track day. After following the instructors on the proper line, I was definitely hitting the apex later, which was better.

I don't like right-hand turns (I know, kinda weird) and was having some problems feeling comfortable in two faster rights on the track later in the day. Then I realized that when I was on the correct line as shown by the instructors I was actually going TOO SLOW and it felt like I was "falling around" in the corner. Sped up and it felt much better!

Get thee to a track day!
 

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TX907, I know what you mean about those right hand turns. It took me a while to get over an incident I had with one. I was turning right onto the street where I park, which has cars parked on both sides, so WAY late entry is needed to see around them. I make the turn and this crazy mofo was SMASHING down the street on my side in a crappy toyota (you know the ones with fake rims/shiny hubcaps and big toyota across the windshield), I manage to miss this a$$hole as I swerved and broke and nearly had to run into the parked cars to avoid him. Sometimes it still spooks me pulling in there (lots of idiot drivers I bet have no insurance)
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but in my mind cornering has to be intuitive, if you are thinking of a progression you are behind, too slow, maybe in the ditch.
You have to flow, not think, it has to be as natural as walking or chewing gum (I could never do both at the same time) or falling down when you're drunk.
My 2
 
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Here's a thought.....what if you could go faster without thinking about going fast?
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but in my mind cornering has to be intuitive, if you are thinking of a progression you are behind, too slow, maybe in the ditch.
You have to flow, not think, it has to be as natural as walking or chewing gum (I could never do both at the same time) or falling down when you're drunk.
My 2
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Pogo:

On the intuition: The MSF course made me much faster and safer in corners. Little stuff like cranking my head in the direction of the corner. Now that I am mildly competent, maybe, I need to go faster safer.

I think hitting the late apexes may be an answer, because I seem to be fast on roads that have hairpins where you charge, brake,throw the bike into the turn and hit the throttle. One does not have a choice but to late apex.

Still, I know there is a mantra for a proper flow. Will look for additional suggestions/reading material from you all! :)

Regards,
Rideon
 
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I have read Code's A twist of the wrist and it was useful. I have found the best learning tool is staying on someones ass who is faster than you. This may be a little dangerous though.

But, when I am leading the pack. I use to go in too hot witha handeful of brake and everyone on my ass. Now, I find a steady smooth rhythem. And it seems my friends haev a harder time keeping up with me. But, it is a lot easier on me and the bike, less braking and softer acceleration.

Regardless, Riding styles are a dime a dozen. Do what makes you comfortable, but do it well. Your mind will tell you when you screw up. The trick is knowing when to reassure your mind evrything is ok.
 
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