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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, Everyone. Thanks for reading.
I have a trip coming up which will take me from Chicago to Colorado. Presently, a uhaul 6x12 trailer has been booked to carry my Monster 1200. That trailer served me well on a previous trip.

But now I am thinking of going the ramp & bed route. My equipment is a 2016 Colorado with the 5' bed. Should be barely adequate.

My questions are:
1. Do you think it is necessary to mount a wheel chock in the bed? I have heard it is not necessary as long as I'm doing 4 straps.
2. Do you think it is safe to load / unload without a second person?
3. If you have done this before, what are your experiences?

I am considering getting a Titan ramp (picture). Considered the bigger ATV ramps, but the ramp has to fold up and fit into the bed, too.
226959



Thanks in advance.
 

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Yes, I’d use a wheel chock to ensure the front wheel stays locked into a straight position. If you had to make a violent maneuver, you want that wheel secured. Even an inexpensive Harbor Freight chock would work, which would allow you to strap the front wheel to the chock, locking the two together. If you don’t want to drill holes in your truck bed, mount the chock to a piece of plywood or a long board where the front and rear wheels sit on the board.

I’ve hauled Harley baggers in the bed of my full-size truck with no chock, but wouldn't do that now w/o a chock. As for ramps, you’re going to need a ramp for your bike and two for your feet. Also, the ramps need to be tightly tethered to the truck when loading/unloading to prevent them from slipping. Next, you need to make sure the ramp isn’t so steep that the bottom of your Monster drags. Also, I wound load/unload with at least one person helping. Lastly, if you can find a place where the ground is uneven, like a swell, ditch, etc, where you can back the truck into, that will bring the tailgate down closer to the ground. This is the way I loaded/unload my bagger.

Remember, when you first ride onto the ramp your front wheel will be climbing and your rear wheel will be on the ground. This is going to raise the seat height noticeably, so unless you’re really tall, your feet will not touch the ground.
 

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Are you referring to the 6x12 cargo trailer or utility? One of their utility trailers has a built in chock (cutout) for motorcycles. The cargo trailers are ok, but I find that some of them aren't great for tying down bikes. Some Ancra soft hooks might help in this situation. If you don't have a Canyon Dancer, they can come in handy (I have both versions, depending on situation, but find the Bar Harness II to be gentlest on your grips). The ramps you are considering might be a little overkill for your application, but should work fine and have the added flexibility of hauling ATV's in the future.

I tend to use wheel chocks nowadays, but have hauled 10's of thousands of miles without them in both cargo/utility/motorcycle trailers, box trucks, vans, and pickup truck beds with nary a problem. I'm not a fan of regular bolt in chocks -- I use Baxley Sport Chocks. They are very heavy duty, extremely well made, sturdy, and serve as great garage stands for parking or light maintenance duty. But the main reason I use them is so that I don't have to compress my forks when tying them down -- roll the bike into the Baxley, flip the safety latch, attach the Canyon Dancers, and attach tie down straps snug to the forward hooks in the bed (tight with no slack, but not necessary to compress your forks much). They work well in trailers too, however, I prefer PitBull's Trailer Restraints when applicable.

Here's a pic of two of the bikes in a rented Ford F-150 with two Baxley's, two Canyon Dancers, and a single ramp for a trip from the greater Los Angeles area to Laguna Seca (about 600 miles roundtrip). We had contemplated taking a trailer, but didn't want to have to reduce our Interstate speed. The truck didn't have a bed extender and we tied down the rear wheels the keep them from hopping over bumps as the bikes are very light. HTH
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Are you referring to the 6x12 cargo trailer or utility? One of their utility trailers has a built in chock (cutout) for motorcycles. The cargo trailers are ok, but I find that some of them aren't great for tying down bikes. Some Ancra soft hooks might help in this situation. If you don't have a Canyon Dancer, they can come in handy (I have both versions, depending on situation, but find the Bar Harness II to be gentlest on your grips). The ramps you are considering might be a little overkill for your application, but should work fine and have the added flexibility of hauling ATV's in the future.
Thank you very much for taking the time to provide such detail. Much appreciated.

The uhaul currently booked is enclosed. Used the same size last year to haul a pair of bikes (no chocks), and was planning on using it this year for just the Monster, again without chocks. Proper set of Rhino straps.

I shall look into the equipment you mentioned.

Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi, Everyone. I have been researching ramps and wheel chocks. Thank you for the suggestions.
Question: What's the difference if I use, instead of the Baxley Sport Chock, my plain 'ol Pitbull rear stand? Doesn't it accomplish the same goal? Straps will still be present, of course.
Thank you very much.
 

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Are you referring to the 6x12 cargo trailer or utility? One of their utility trailers has a built in chock (cutout) for motorcycles. The cargo trailers are ok, but I find that some of them aren't great for tying down bikes. Some Ancra soft hooks might help in this situation. If you don't have a Canyon Dancer, they can come in handy (I have both versions, depending on situation, but find the Bar Harness II to be gentlest on your grips). The ramps you are considering might be a little overkill for your application, but should work fine and have the added flexibility of hauling ATV's in the future.

I tend to use wheel chocks nowadays, but have hauled 10's of thousands of miles without them in both cargo/utility/motorcycle trailers, box trucks, vans, and pickup truck beds with nary a problem. I'm not a fan of regular bolt in chocks -- I use Baxley Sport Chocks. They are very heavy duty, extremely well made, sturdy, and serve as great garage stands for parking or light maintenance duty. But the main reason I use them is so that I don't have to compress my forks when tying them down -- roll the bike into the Baxley, flip the safety latch, attach the Canyon Dancers, and attach tie down straps snug to the forward hooks in the bed (tight with no slack, but not necessary to compress your forks much). They work well in trailers too, however, I prefer PitBull's Trailer Restraints when applicable.

Here's a pic of two of the bikes in a rented Ford F-150 with two Baxley's, two Canyon Dancers, and a single ramp for a trip from the greater Los Angeles area to Laguna Seca (about 600 miles roundtrip). We had contemplated taking a trailer, but didn't want to have to reduce our Interstate speed. The truck didn't have a bed extender and we tied down the rear wheels the keep them from hopping over bumps as the bikes are very light. HTH
View attachment 226961
The one I use has an air bag suspension that can be defeated to the point I can just ride on, secure the bike with straps and air it up and drive off. Have used it for about 10 years with great success
 

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Hi, Everyone. I have been researching ramps and wheel chocks. Thank you for the suggestions.
Question: What's the difference if I use, instead of the Baxley Sport Chock, my plain 'ol Pitbull rear stand? Doesn't it accomplish the same goal? Straps will still be present, of course.
Thank you very much.
With the Baxley (or similar), the wheel "cradle" pivots forward, keeping the front wheel firmly in the chock against the V-shaped brace. Once in place, it has both fore/aft and lateral stability. All that's really needed to secure the bike is a couple of straps pulling the bike forward against the chock to keep the bike from tipping in case of an extreme maneuver. On it's own, the Baxley is actually very, very stable.

A rear stand simply lifts the rear of the bike upwards. I don't remember how much lateral stability a Pitbull single-side stand has as I use different SSSA stands. If you tie down the bike properly, you really don't need a chock. Again, I primarily use them to avoid keeping my forks compressed while traveling long distances. To be fair, I don't know if there is any noticeable detrimental effect for keeping your fork springs compressed for long periods of time (I've done several cross country trips with various bikes tied down without chocks), but I run Ohlins forks on a lot of my current bikes, and I generally don't service my forks nowadays, so it's more for peace of mind for me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A rear stand simply lifts the rear of the bike upwards. I don't remember how much lateral stability a Pitbull single-side stand has
Mr. Terminator, the pit bull stand is hella stable. From time to time, when non-rider guests are over, they can easily mount the bike with absolutely no fear. At this point, I think my best bet is to pull the trigger on the ramp, and try a short haul around town.

Generic photo for context:


Thanks again for everyone's thoughts on this thread.
 

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I believe you. I have several Pitbull stands in my garage, just not one for a SSSA. We frequently lift/lower the rear stands with the rider mounted as they enter/exit the garage at trackdays. What I meant was lateral or side to side stability. I recall them being not prone to tipping even when leaning off a little (I've used a lot of Pitbulls in photo shoots and the models have hung off the bikes in various ways with nary a problem), but I simply meant that they are not designed to do what a wheel chock does. BTW, I like your 1098. Really an underrated bike IMO.
 

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Mine traveled from damn near Fargo ND to Indianapolis with nothing more than decent ratchet straps, cheap steel ramps and two guys to load and unload. We set the second ramp about halfway up the first to give a much longer approach which worked really well. Just used a ratchet strap around the ramps to the trucks hitch. It was solid but if I thought I were gonna do it much I’d probably upgrade the whole rig to something like what the others are saying. Wouldn’t want to blow out fork seals but I also wouldn’t worry about doing a damn thing to the rear other than strapping the rear wheel down. Stands sound like a real bad idea to me.

Good luck and have fun!
 
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