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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I’ve recently installed a Termignoni full system on my 2015 Monster 1200S Stripe. I did the system install myself with only a few small issues. I thought it might be helpful to document the unboxing and installation, so took a few pics during the process.

Un-Boxing




The long-anticipated box finally arrives at the doorstep



All the small bits and paperwork







The parts were well-protected in multiple layers of insta-pack



Mmmmmmm… Carbon Fiber



Yup, all there… Time to install!
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Uninstalling the Stock System



Start with removing the stock canister



Remove the cable attaching the butterfly and the controlling motor



Then remove the stock collector. Had to “persuade” them with penetrating oil and some plastic trim tools.



Carefully remove the O2 sensor and the stock front head-pipe



And finally (for the pipes anyhow), remove the heat shield and mid-pipe.

A few thoughts at this point. I should have realized from all the documentation I looked at, but I thought this was a FULL replacement system. Turns out that you leave a bit of the stock rear head-pipe with the rear O2 sensor. It isn’t really seen, it’s covered by the heat shield for the most part. Still, I took a scotchbrite pad and cleaned it up a bit so it would match the new stuff.



Here are the bits of the stock system that remain.

Before I start reversing the removal process with the new bits, there remains the fiddly job of removing the butterfly motor from the bottom of the battery box. I don’t really have any pictures of this tedious and lengthy job, as there really wasn’t much room and it required at least both my hands at all times. But, here are the offending bits once they were removed.



The kit was supposed to come with a cover for the plug that remained after the motor removal (according to the instructions I got online), but I couldn’t find anything. I ended up making my own out of a conveniently-sized plastic cap that came out of lawn furniture or some such. Turned out to be just the right size, but your mileage may vary.

Now I can start reversing the process with the new stuff…
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Installing the New System



Install the new front head-pipe and mid-pipe. It was shortly after this photo was taken that I realized that there were two different sizes of pipe clamps. A bigger one for the muffler and a smaller one for the mid-pipe. As shown here, I’ve put the wrong one on. So, after carefully arranging the new pipes and going through the difficult process of putting them together (very tight fit, be warned!), I was going to have to remove half of the work to get the right clamp on there. Oh well…



There, that’s better. Just a few more finishing up bits left.



Carefully install the O2 sensor into the new front head-pipe (don’t forget the anti-seize). I counter-twisted the sensor wire so it would be relatively un-twisted once I got it threaded into the pipe.



And on the other side from the O2 sensor there is another threaded hole (not sure why). Anyhow, you have to get the plug from the old exhaust system and re-use it here. Again, don’t forget the anti-seize.



And the last little shield and all done with the hardware bits! That little heel guard had me digging into the toolbox to get an allen wrench that small. It took much longer than expected.

So, off to the dealer to get the fuel mapping ($66) and startup shows “Racing EVO”… Yay!
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The Verdict

What’s the verdict? I’ll start with the bad…


  • Finish is OK, but not as great as I would have thought for the price. A few mangy looking bits and a little touch up painting required on the muffler bracket.
  • I would have liked a new version of that little bit of pipe on the rear cylinder (again one of those “for that price” sorts of things), but it did make the install a little easier. Oddly, the kit comes with two exhaust gaskets.
  • Missing cover for the plug remaining after pulling the butterfly motor. Maybe my instructions were out of date, and it’s not included now, but ended up finding a work-around.
  • Y-pipe to the two mufflers seems to be MORE in the way of my feet that the stock setup. I thought I’d be getting an improvement, so a little disappointed there.

The good…


  • Yes, it sounds nice. I didn’t think the stock system sounded bad, but this is a bit better. Disclaimer: I haven’t tried it without the DB-killers yet.
  • Yes, it looks nice. Again, stock system not horrible, but an improvement for sure.
  • Goes together well. I've had a number of aftermarket horror stories, but this is like putting on a factory part (which it essentially is). Everything goes where it is supposed to and fits. No bending, hammering, or heating required. Although, being a Ducati, you'll use every tool in the toolbox (and then some) to complete the job.

    (Important stuff here)
  • It runs tremendously cooler. I guess with bigger diameter tubing, and the removal of a blockage (the butterfly valve) as well as removing an additional heat source (the cat), I should have expected something, but not this dramatic. When I rode the bike to the dealer, it was July in Florida, and hotter outside than I would have chosen to ride for pleasure. But the bike itself was obviously cooler, both before and after the fueling chip upgrade.
  • But finally, it transforms the bike. It was much improved at low RPM even on the way to the dealer, but still had some stumble in the mid-range, particularly when accelerating out of a corner. On the way back from the dealer, the mid-range was spot on. I was really impressed with the rideability improvement. I was doing all sorts of silly high-gear roll-ons, lugging the engine, slow riding and whatnot on the way home, just amazed. It was obviously the exhaust and mapping the bike was designed to have (before all the rules come into play).
Was it worth it? On one hand, I’d say the box of plumbing I got in the box was no way worth that kind of money. But the enjoyment factor improvement on what was a pricey bike (bought for enjoyment)? Absolutely! I could have easily spent more money chasing a better ride in other ways without getting these results.

I give them a thumbs up.
 

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My bike came with the termi slip-ons and mapping, I've wanted the wider pipes but can't find them anywhere :( Can't compare it to the stock like you but I've always been impressed by how well it runs, especially down low in the rpms (considering everything I'd read about ducatis hating low revs).

Definitely take the DB killers out, now THAT is how the bike is supposed to sound.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Photobucket seems to have crapped out on me. Sorry, after all that work putting those together. Can I put the pics on here and reference them?
 

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Photobucket seems to have crapped out on me. Sorry, after all that work putting those together. Can I put the pics on here and reference them?
Make an account on imgur.com, upload them onto there and then click on each one, look on the right side where there's a bunch of picture addresses, copy the "bb code" one and paste in a post on here.:wink
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Off topic, can you put the Corbin seat in either position or only the lowest?
The Corbin is single-position only and cannot be adjusted. You more or less set the bike up for the "low" seat position (remove the little plastic decorative bits, but don't change the position of the "seat hook" behind the tank).

The Corbin seat is thicker, so seat height is only a little less than regular seat in "not low" position... If that makes any sense.

Essentially, for me (who has the factory seat in the "not low" position), I remove the regular seat, remove the decorative plastic trim panels on either side of the seat area on the bike and put the Corbin seat on.
 

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The Corbin is single-position only and cannot be adjusted. You more or less set the bike up for the "low" seat position (remove the little plastic decorative bits, but don't change the position of the "seat hook" behind the tank).

The Corbin seat is thicker, so seat height is only a little less than regular seat in "not low" position... If that makes any sense.

Essentially, for me (who has the factory seat in the "not low" position), I remove the regular seat, remove the decorative plastic trim panels on either side of the seat area on the bike and put the Corbin seat on.
Thanks. I guess that means I won't have a place for my Scorpio alarm, etc under the seat if I buy a Corbin then.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Generally no, but I have heard that some folks have either put cut-outs in the bottom of the seat or had Corbin mod the seat when building it. Personally, I kind of got a blank look from the Corbin guy when I discussed that (I was originally concerned about a RapidBike or similar).

I was hoping Sargent would do a Monster seat, as they do a better job of replicating the original seat pan (and are lighter). Calling the Corbin a "saddle" is actually pretty descriptive, as that is what it feels like when I'm putting it on the bike (throwing a saddle over a horse). Heavy, but build like a tank too.
 

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Btw, Ducati OEM alarm still fits with the Corbin seat as it is installed inside the tool pocket in the subframe. No room for anything else though. You can always make a cutout.
 
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