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Michael Moore said:
It seems to me the situation that is more dangerous is when traffic comes to an unexpected stop, especially on the freeway. Then if someone rear ends you it'll be more like 40-60 mph! :eek: In these cases I like to get to the far left side of my lane, or split, to give the person behind a bit more room to stop (and something else to hit - like the guy in front of me).
I was coming up on stopped traffic and decided it was safe enough to split. I slowed down enough to split, but not enough to stop. I remembered I had some stupid cager following too close and was glad to be rid of him. Anyway, I split the lane and behind me I hear screeching tires and a crunch.

I think that guy learned his lesson about following too close to a bike that day >:D

no one was hurt btw. just the average fender bender.
 

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When I am the first vehicle in a busy intersection, where I have no way to escape, I keep the bike in neutral with my hand on the front brake. If someone is coming in a bit fast behind me, I wave my left arm up and down like a one armed jumping jack. Look stupid? Yep. But I guarantee it has saved me.

When I am a couple of vehicles back, I usually stay in gear and point the bike facing to the outer edge so that if I have to get out of the way, I am pointed to the side of the road rather than oncoming traffic
 

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This incident was a combination of fatigue/lack of concentration on my part and the act of a fine upstanding member of the Sydney (Aus) community who decided it be best if they drive off rather than stop to see if I was OK.

Recap: I was traveling in the right lane (first mistake) after a 300km ride down the South Coast of NSW. I was 5 minutes from home (how many times do you hear that?) and in cruise mode (about 40km/h). As the traffic began to slow (most dangerous time), the said motorist decided the left lane was a dead duck and made a snap decision and came across into one of those imaginery gaps.

What I did wrong: In hindsight, I should have hit them (from an insurance and just so they felt bad!!) but I reckon I would have come off second best. I combined fatigue with being almost home (so relaxed) and heavy use of the front break only (no back) - oh, I was also traveling down a hill (didn't help).

What I did right: Not much really. I guess wearing leathers and a good helmet (I got to know the road pretty well for about 10 metres).

Thoughts on how it might have been avoided: Better anticipation, staying in the left lane, use of both brakes, avoiding Sunday drivers (late afternoon is the worst!). Stayed the night down the coast and enjoyed a few beers instead of a few bandages!!
 

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What happened: Traveling down the 205 into Portland Oregon at 67 mph at 7 AM. It was just after sunrise on a clear day, so there was plenty of light. Small, dark SUV comes up on my right from the far right lane, putting me in their blind spot. Then immediately (before I can get out of their blind spot) they suddenly swerve into my lane (no signal, no warning, no time to react) clips my front tire taking me down, and never just keeps on going. There was no reason for them to swerve like that, they just decided to change lanes as quickly as possible.
My left knee hit the ground as the bike went down to the left and then I ended up on my back/right side and slid for about 150 ft (or so the police say from the marks on the road).

What I did right: Wearing all the right gear; leather riding coat, chaps, combat boots(great ankle support), riding gloves, full-face helmet, backpack loaded with a minimum amount of items with waist and chest strap. The bag took a lot of the sliding around. My chaps saved my left knee which ended up swollen and painful, but I was able to walk out of the ER two hours later. The rest of my gear was totally trashed except for my coat which was saved by my bag.

What I did wrong: Wore chaps instead of riding pants (had them for 8 years, they always seemed good enough to me). I ended up with a hamgurger patty size spot of road rash on my right buttock where the chaps didn't cover.
I really didn't have any time to do anything differently, I think that I was doing everything correctly and almost think that the driver did it on purpose because of how fast and seemingly deliberate their actions were. I might have been able to brake just enough to barely get missed. The woman behind me said that it happened so fast there was nothing I could have done about it.

What I have learned: Buy riding PANTS, not chaps. Be more alert, realize that people don't care about or see other drivers especially motorcyclists, yeah I thought I had that one down. Don't get confident in my daily commute. Avoid SUVs. Be grateful that I walked away (basically) unscathed from a 67 mph crash by no fault of my own.

WEAR FULL SAFETY GEAR EVERY RIDE, EVERY TIME, NO MATTER WHAT.

The Doc
 

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Glad you guys are all (basically) ok. Could have been much worse, especially Dr. Woodrow.

Chaps do not equal leather pants as DW said. There are several large chunks of meat on your lower body that chaps do not cover.
 

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OK, not a full blown crash, but I did go down the other day...

Pulled up to a T intersection and I was too busy looking at the cross-traffic to notice what was going on right under my feet. Pulled up to a nice stop and put my feet down. My left foot went down in some oil and my foot slipped right out from under me. I tried to stay upright, but everywhere I put my foot down, the oil on the bottom of my boot said, "No!"

Kerflop! to put it nicely. I did have enough presence of mind to hit the kill switch as soon as I felt that I wasn't going to stay upright. I instictively put my left hand out to stop the fall (luckily the engine stopped before I let off the clutch) and managed to pull my leg out from under the bike just before it hit the asphalt.

As for me, I suffered a sprained left wrist with a possible hairline fracture in one of the marble-y wrist bones, a lump on my left buttock, and a severely bruised ego as I had to wave the cars around me while I got my stuff together.

As for my my bike, I broke my bar end mirror, but the price I paid for it was worth saving the rest of my bike. Surprisingly enough, not too many scratches anywhere else except on the shifter peg and the rear left turn signal and a tad bit on my pipes. The bars weren't bent, and everything else looked fine. Pulled her upright let her sit for a minute and started her right up and she ran great. Rode her home with no mirror (I only had the left one) and it was scary as hell driving without a mirror - especially on on the interstate.

What I did right: Was wearing all my gear. I was paying attention to the traffic. Hit the kill switch as soon as I knew something wasn't right.

What I did wrong: I didn't pay attention to my surroudings underfoot. I really do try to pay attention to that kind of thing - looking for sand, paint lines, etc. This just took me off guard.

I've known guys that have dropped their bikes and have done worse damage to themselves and the bike by pulling up in the driveway and forgetting to put the sidestand down. Help my ego and tell me this is just one of those things...

Like I said, this wasn't a crash, but still, you can get hurt at zero mph.
 

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Terrapin said:
I've known guys that have dropped their bikes and have done worse damage to themselves and the bike by pulling up in the driveway and forgetting to put the sidestand down. Help my ego and tell me this is just one of those things...
Sorry to hear that, hope you heal up soon. Glad your bike is relatively ok.

And don't worry, you're in good company.
http://www.ducatimonster.org/smf/index.php?topic=100322.0
 

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Terrapin said:
I've known guys that have dropped their bikes and have done worse damage to themselves and the bike by pulling up in the driveway and forgetting to put the sidestand down. Help my ego and tell me this is just one of those things...
That stuff happens. You can't always know what's underfoot. And when you go down, even at zero speed, you can still break a wrist or an ankle.

If it make you feel any better, once, after about a decade of riding, I pulled up the parking garage attendant to pay him. I took both my hands off the bars and was steading the bike with just my legs. I reached over to hand him my ticket and musta pushed the bike. It just started to go. By the time I got my hands on it, it was too far over to save. I let it down slowly, so as not to hurt anything. The ego was the worst though. I'm blushing in embarassment as I type this. Those wounds never heal. It helps that we all have 'em though.

Sometimes, **** happens. Sucks about the wrist, but I'd just chock it up to poor karma. It's embarassing, but we've all been there.
 

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Recap: Country roads in NZ (where we drive on the left). A number of years ago when I rode a Yamaha R6. I was still *fairly* new to riding and quite cautious, although my confidence was growing. I had no real motorcycling friends, but finally met a few people who rode bikes, and accepted an invitation to go for a long ride out of town with the group. Faster guys took off ahead, and slower riders drop back, but everyone regroups at gas-stops and important intersections. I was sort of mid-pack, and after a regroup, was one of the first to take off again, figuring I'd just be passed by anyone faster.

After a medium length straight we came to a smooth, gradual 100-110kph left hander, I'm lined up on the outside of the lane to get a good view through the corner and a nice, late apex, just starting to turn in. During the straight, stupid/fast guy decides he should be in front and tries to catch up to pass, but fails to complete the maneuver before the bend. He decides he'd better get back in his own lane in case of oncoming traffic, and is traveling much faster, and needs a different line to me to get through the bend. Just as I'm turning in, his bike appears to my right, cutting in front of me and clipping my right bar-end and front tire with the rear of his bike. Suddenly I'm a passenger, wrestling with the bars and finally dropping over the right side of the bike, sliding through the oncoming lane into a conveniently placed gravel patch. No injuries. My new(ish) bike is no longer new, plastics being torn up and clutch cover ground-through, with misc. bumps and bruises. Thank God there was no oncoming traffic. <shudder>

What I did right: Wore the gear. Rode to my skill/comfort-level. It's amazing how protective full leathers are.

What I did wrong: Rode with idiots. Put idiots behind me. I really need to be careful who I ride with, and if in doubt, I think I'd rather pass them than have them pass me. I'd have been much better to leave last and pass those I'm faster than, than be passed by the reckless road racers. No insurance. I thought it was too expensive, and that I was cautious enough not to need it (I was sort-of right; the repair bill would have been less than my premium), which leads to my biggest mistake... I let the ****er get away with his reckless riding.    ::)

I wanted to have biker buddies so bad, that I didn't make the asshole fix my bike. I cringe at the memory. Lines like "racing incident" were thrown around by the group, and I let it fly. Nobody else seemed to think it was a big deal, so I took my lead from them. The reality was I didn't know **** about fixing bikes, and I wanted a nice shiny new one like I paid for, and this guy screwed it up for me. I ended up selling the bike for a song just to try and erase the memory. Put me off riding for years.    :mad:

But now I'm back...    :D
 

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Recap:
Was riding today down an interstate highway with some friends in their cages, and was getting off on a wide right hand exit. Slowed down to about 55mph, and was on the outside of the turn. Noticed further up the curve that there was some gravel creeping into my line. Target-fixated for way too long and...next thing you know I'm on the shoulder, and definitely not going to stay on the road. I straighten up, and coast off the road. (it goes down into a little gully of sorts.) It wasn't bad until I hit the bottom of the hill, where there was lots of lumpy grass and mud. Bike gets squirrelly, and flips, sending me over the handlebars.

What I did right:
Wore my helmet and and armored leather jacket and gloves. Once I was in the grass, I tried to trail brake. Yeah, that's about it.

What I did wrong:
I target-fixated!! I was probably going a little too fast for that exit.

Thoughts on how it might have been avoided:
Well, for starters, after I saw the gravel, I should have looked back up the curve where I wanted to go, leaned in a bit more, and maybe trail-braked a touch. Possibly taken a different line once I was off road, away from the mucky mess. I could have taken the turn slower as well.

Luckily, I emerged with nothing broken. Turns out mud, while poor for driving a monster, makes and for an excellent landing. My bike buried itself in the mud, yet only broke one turn signal, and one mirror. The mirror, however, was broken by my leg when I flew over the handlebars. I was very thankful that my friends were there to help. I dare say I consider myself lucky, as it could have been much worse.

Here's the photo of my line down the hill. When I came back later, it looked like I was actually bouncing quite high off the ground. See the two lines, yeah, I wasn't exactly going straight by the end.
 

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You're welcome.

What do you do to practice controlling target fixation? I'm asking because I try to practice controlling my target fixation and wondered if you've thought about it since the accident.
 

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EvilSteve said:
You're welcome.

What do you do to practice controlling target fixation? I'm asking because I try to practice controlling my target fixation and wondered if you've thought about it since the accident.
I have thought about it quite a bit, actually. But, I'm really not sure how to practice for it. So, any advice you or anyone else has would be greatly appreciated. Because that's a mistake I don't want to repeat!
 

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I'm no expert on training on these things but I actually try to train myself by looking at things and then looking away. I also try to stare at things like leaves on the road and then miss them. Target fixation is something you can reduce the effects of IMO but it can also be used to your advantage by looking through the corner.

I think it's easier to control your target fixation if you're scanning ahead and not riding beyond your limits. Of course, knowing where your limits are is a really difficult question.

Has anyone seen any material regarding controlling target fixation?
 

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so i had my first crash last night. I was working on my bro-inlaw's 81 honda cm400. I had just rebuilt the carbs and was taking it for a test ride. Well I got about two blocks from my house and the front brake locked up without warning. I did go down but I was only traveling at about ten mph. Now my shoulder is sore but Im ok. The bike is fine now. there is a ding in the headlight bezel and in the tank, but all is good.

What did i learn? well I learned that you cant trust old brakes that haven't been serviced for almost two decades. I will try not to let this happen again. :-\
 
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