Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,033 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Due to limitation in ground clearance caused by my Low Mount Exhaust, I have to get off the bike a bit more in the twisties to keep the bike upright. Now here is my question, or well discussion topic.

As I approach a turn I brake, get my body into position, counter steer to get the bike to lean and then negotiate the turn. However, as soon as I get leaned it seems that my counter steering goes away. Like I'm keeping the front very neutral if not even slightly turned INTO the turn at times. Now my not very experienced thinking on this is that my body is giving me the force needed to make the turn thus eliminating the need for the counter steer.

To bring counter steer back into the picture I've been thinking that I just need to increase my speed, giving me a bit more centrifugal force to overcome. Which would then in turn make me faster in that turn.

Now my discussion/question is do you all find this theory acceptable? Or am I leading myself down a path of bad techniques towards the Meat Grinder?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
96 Posts
Due to limitation in ground clearance caused by my Low Mount Exhaust, I have to get off the bike a bit more in the twisties to keep the bike upright. Now here is my question, or well discussion topic.

As I approach a turn I brake, get my body into position, counter steer to get the bike to lean and then negotiate the turn. However, as soon as I get leaned it seems that my counter steering goes away. Like I'm keeping the front very neutral if not even slightly turned INTO the turn at times. Now my not very experienced thinking on this is that my body is giving me the force needed to make the turn thus eliminating the need for the counter steer.
That's completely normal. I don't tend to worry about where the front wheel is pointing. What I focus on is getting the weight transfered to the back wheel with the throttle and looking through the corner especially when corner speed is getting into the scary zone. I have found that with racecars and bikes that as long as I keep my eyes up and looking where I want to go my brian and the bike will get me there even with the back end skittering around. I've only had the front end tuck once on the track and I stayed upright because I had my eyes focused on where I wanted to be next.

To bring counter steer back into the picture I've been thinking that I just need to increase my speed, giving me a bit more centrifugal force to overcome. Which would then in turn make me faster in that turn.
It doesn't matter how fast you are going the front end is only going to be faced away from the direction of travel till the lean angle is set. Oops that's not quite true if you are sliding the back end around the front wheel will be pointing away to keep the bike moving where you want it to go.

Now my discussion/question is do you all find this theory acceptable? Or am I leading myself down a path of bad techniques towards the Meat Grinder?
I highly recommend track time. It will a) make you faster and b) give you a number of repeatable corners to sneak up on the limit of your skill and the bikes abilities. Plus it's a cheap and legal adreneline fix.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,033 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the response... that's kind of what I was thinking... and most of this discussion is based on track riding. I'm waiting for my next day :) (thanksgiving weekend!)

Using the throttle to transfer weight after entering a turn is also something I've been working on as well :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,755 Posts
Sounds like what you're describing is a well set-up bike. Ideally, once you set the bike into a turn radius, it should tend to hold it unless you change the throttle input or make another steering input. If you did have to continue applying countersteering effort after you were leaned over, that would mean that your bike is trying to straighten up. You'd then be fighting the bike all the way through the turn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
769 Posts
So...I have steering problem...I know now what to do...I just need to do it...here's what I know: if you're going to hang off, get into that position before you set your entry speed (by braking or rolling off throttle). At turn point, steer your bike one time (countersteer and set lean angle once), as soon as your bike is turned, you can practically take your hands off the handlebar except you have to roll on throttle gently and constantly. If you turn it and set lean right and throttle on appropriately, you won't have to steer the bike again during the turn.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top