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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
does anybody have any opinions on the competitive differences from my 800S to a SV650? other than the similarity in design, are these pretty well matched in power and handling? just curious, a good friend has been telling me since I traded my SV for the monster he is gonna spank me in the spring! we have similar riding experience and capabilities. thanks everyone!
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
According to testing done by Motorcycle Consumer News (THE must-have subscription for the discerning motorcyclist)

The Suzuki 2003 SV650 has:

68.6 rear wheel hp
45.2 lb.ft. rear wheel torque
428 lbs wet weight
126 mph top speed
3.74 0-60 time
1:6.24 power-weight ratio

They haven't tested the 800s yet, but here are the numbers for the 1998 Monster 750 - keep in mind this is a bike six years older than the 2003 sv650 cited above

57.4 real wheel hp
44.7 lb.ft. rear wheel torque
425 lbs wet weight
118 mph top speed
4.34 0-60 time
1:7.4 power-weight ratio

MCN numbers are reliable because they test all bikes the same way. PR numbers from moto companies can be misleading. As you can see, a six year-old m750 would be outclassed by a 2003 sv650. Maybe somebody around here can dig up performance numbers on the new m800s.

Ultimately, the joy of Monster ownership and ridership is not in the numbers... there are far more efficient bikes on the market - both in terms of price, cost of ownership, and performance. What nothing else out there can match is the sheer enjoyment of riding that a Monster offers. That's why you'll have a hard time finding many former Monster owners riding around on sv650s, 919s, or any of the other clone bike rip-offs of the Monster concept. On the contrary, you'll find quite a few converts among Ducatisti that won't ever go back to boring, soulless Japanese bikes.
 

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If I am not mistaken Motorcyclist has the numbers a bit closer than MCN. Besides that I have a buddy with a 2001 SV that I have ridden. We have never lined up side by side, because my 750 is a race bike, but I would choose the monster over the sv. The SV feels stronger in the higher rpms, but the Monster feels better down low and the monster suspension (before I set it up for the track) is far better. Your 800 should be very close in acceleration.
I doubt very much you are going to get spanked.
GT
 

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The SV650 was close to an even match for a stock M900. The new M800 is supposed to be closer to a 900 than 750 in power. Ultimately, comparing an SV650 to an M800S in the twisties will have a lot more to do with rider skill than the bikes.

When you park the two bikes together, the Monster will get more attention than the Suzuki. I'm betting that you'll have more fun on the Monster than on an SV, unless the only way you can have fun is by winning acceleration contests.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
One of the guys I ride with has an SV650. When I had my 800 I always felt like I was playing catch up. The monster had more low end, but he would pull away once he got higher in his tach.

I felt like there was so much of a difference between the two bikes I regretted buying the monster. Well at least until we got parked. Then, as previously mentioned, the Monster was definetly ahead.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would hate my decision to purchase a Monster if the only time I appreciated it was when parked.

Like Scott said, if your riding enjoyment comes soley from going fast in a straight line, you may find other bikes to be better for you than a Monster. But what's the point in riding in a straight line? It gets old. Fast.

Real riding takes place in the turns. I haven't ridden anything that even comes close to comparing to the feel of a Monster in the twisties.. so responsive, so natural - the bike truly becomes an extension of the self... hitting the twisties on my Monster is truly a transcendent experience.

There's Joy in riding a Monster... I think it has something to do with the way Italians build bikes because the only time I've come close to the Joy of riding a Ducati was on my friend's Moto Guzzi.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I whole heartedly agree about the feel of the monster in the curves, i have not been riding long, but the feeling of confidence i get when i ride is very inspiring. it truly feels like an extension of myself. i do however like to compare the numbers of one bike to the next. i know the dry weight of the two bikes is a 30 lb difference, 363 vs 393, the horse is 63 vs 73, but i dont know how much torque the 800S has.
on top of the riding, just saying ducati in the 'island' that is worcester inspires a certain level of respect. it is just amazing how many people who have never owned let alone ridden a ducati are so quick to write it off as a high maintence cost pit. all i can ever say is 'just ride one'. there truly is nothing like it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
im not impressed with how fast a bike can go, so the upper rpm's are only good for lofting the front wheel to me ;D
 

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If you know how to ride your bike, that SV should not be able to spank you. I consistantly ride with bikes that are considerably more powerful than my M800 and none of them ever are able to pull away for long. Maybe if there were LONG stretches or straights it might be a different story, but in my experience on "real world" roads my Monster can keep up with just about anything...
 

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I know this may be comparing apples to oranges but...
I have a 03 620 and my buddy has a 02 SV650 (and he's got years of experience on me)... I play catch up with him. But then again I am riding a 620.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The SV650 was close to an even match for a stock M900.
I've ridden both and of course own a 2001 m900ie. Again, quoting from Motorcycle Consumer News:

Ducati Monster 900ie
75.3 rear wheel hp
54.3 lb. ft rear wheel torque
443 wet weight
134 top speed
4.07 0-60 time
1:5.88 power-weight ratio
 
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