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Discussion Starter #1
I'm a relatively new rider. Riding an m620 I picked up in june with 3K miles. I just started playing with clutchless upshifting, and have a few questions.

When should I use it? Can I do damage?
Do experienced riders use it most of the time especially in upper gears?
What's the appropriate technique?

Sometimes it's smoother than others. Am I doing damage when it clunks in rather than ticks in? I don't force it.
 
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Discussion Starter #2
if done properly, i don't think you'll be damaging the tranny at all, and you'll actually be saving clutch wear obviously.
i've been using the clutch less and less in my daily riding. shifting up and down.
to upshift, get to whatever revs you think are appropriate to get to the next gear. apply a bit of pressure onto the gear shift lever in direction of next uppper gear. quickly back-off the throttle about a 1/4 to 1/2 turn and you'll feel the shift lever snick into the next gear position. quickly get back on the gas to the same position you were in before and the bike will accellerate smoothly. it'll feel kinda jerky initially but if you can do this all in a fluid progress, it'll feel buttery smooth rowing up the gears!

downshifting (this seemed SO unnatural to me until i tried it), while in lower revs, apply a bit of pressure onto the gear shift lever in direction of lower gear. quickly give the throttle a 1/4 - 1/2 turn MORE gas and you'll feel the lever snick into the next lower gear. keep the throttle consistent so that the revs match the wheel speed.

in both cases, when you apply pressure on the lever, keep it consistent and firm. if you're wishy-washy with the pressure you put on the lever through the process, you'll likely wind up between gears in a "false neutral".

as always when experimenting, don't do this in heavy traffic. quiet, safe street with predicatble conditions.
 

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I've been doing the clutchless upshift and have really liked it. Takes some practice, but definitely worth it and oh so smooth. I wasn't entirely sure how to do the downshift though. Thanks, Strati! Will have to give it a go.
 

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Wow, and to think I spent all that money on a new Barnett clutch... ;D ;D ;D
 

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I've been shifting clutchlessly for a while now also. I do about 90% of my upshifts without the clutch. Once you get used to doing it your shifting will be WAY smoother and quicker. Downshifting varies, since sometimes you want to slip the clutch a little when downshifting, but it is deifnitely applicable there too. Right now I'm working on reliably upshifting without the clutch while up on one wheel. I can do it about half the time, but not always in the right power band. When it does happen though, wheelies can be ridden almost forever... :)
 

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" 1/4 to 1/2 turn of throttle" ???
It's hard to put a definite number on that IMO, but why are you questioning that with a frown? What about it is undesireable? 1/4 turn of the wrist sounds about right, once you do it quickly you can learn to shift in about 1/4 second...
 

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Slightly different topic.... but when doing clutchless upshifts on one wheel, how high up does the front need to be in order to keep the wheel off the ground in the next gear? Is there a significant danger of throwing yourself over backwards in the next gear?
 

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That's a good question, one that I'm finding answers to lately. If you try to upshift while on one wheel and flub it, you will come down hard. If you try to upshift and aren't quite in the right power band, the front wheel will come down softly. If you do manage to upshift in the right powerband while on one wheel, I've found that I seem to hold my angle and then quickly but smoothly creep higher. It's actually quite surprising the first few times how smoothly the front continues to lift after shifting to second. If you're paying attention I don't think there is a huge likelyhood that you willl do a sun and go over backwards, but it is always possible.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
My feeling is this...bike manufactures put the clutch there for a reason, and it's not just to get out of 1st gear...why bother with clutchless is my question...
 
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Discussion Starter #15
My feeling is this...bike manufactures put the clutch there for a reason, and it's not just to get out of 1st gear...why bother with clutchless is my question...
well if you're going to look at it that way, the manufacturer also install tall gearing, quiet mufflers, a goofy tailsection, heavy wheels, an airbox lid, etc... etc... etc...
don't take it the wrong way, but when you were a kid, didn't you ever color outside the lines with your crayon? ;)
 
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Discussion Starter #16
when i started riding on the street it was the complete oposite for me i had to remind myself about the clutch a little in certain cases....after racing in the dirt for so many year being able to get on it and just brake the rear wheel loose all the time to hey i have tration was a forigen concept.

as for the wheelie i wouldnt even concern yourself with it until you got this mastered, but yes bloodshot is right, by the way bloodshot its cool to have another person that likes to be on one wheel as much as i do
 
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Discussion Starter #17
My feeling is this...bike manufactures put the clutch there for a reason, and it's not just to get out of 1st gear...why bother with clutchless is my question...
Why?
For smooth and fast shifts. If you really mean business you can buy a microswitch that momentarily cuts the ignition when you shift. That way you can keep full throttle, and still execute lightning fast upshifts!


Bike gearboxes are not built like the gearbox in your car. A modern gearbox on a motorcycle is built to handle clutchless gear changing. If the change is smooth and without any mechanical noise, there's notthing to worry about.

/
 

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bloodshot its cool to have another person that likes to be on one wheel as much as i do
Wheelie's are addicting huh? If it wasn't for cops and my fear of getting more tickets I would probably pop a wheelie almost every block. Just TOO much fun... ;D
 

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Why?
For smooth and fast shifts. If you really mean business you can buy a microswitch that momentarily cuts the ignition when you shift. That way you can keep full throttle, and still execute lightning fast upshifts!


Bike gearboxes are not built like the gearbox in your car. A modern gearbox on a motorcycle is built to handle clutchless gear changing. If the change is smooth and without any mechanical noise, there's notthing to worry about.

/

Cujo,
 

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Why?
For smooth and fast shifts. If you really mean business you can buy a microswitch that momentarily cuts the ignition when you shift. That way you can keep full throttle, and still execute lightning fast upshifts!


Bike gearboxes are not built like the gearbox in your car. A modern gearbox on a motorcycle is built to handle clutchless gear changing. If the change is smooth and without any mechanical noise, there's notthing to worry about.

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Cujo, i found when i'm racing other guys i ride with, FLAT changing (clutch assisted, just a light touch) works great ;D

I'd challenge anyone to shift quicker than that!

I use clutchless upshifts & downshifts when cruising on a lesurly Sunday afternoon, nice & smooth i agree!
 
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