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Discussion Starter #1
Got my girl back together last night, and Oh My God is she screamin now! I am a happy hoodlum. ;D

I've got to give Mad Props to Chris for his help with my 'little' project. Instructions, shipping, and help cia phone and email were top-notch. We're all very lucky to have people around like Chris and crew to feed our habits. Could be a lot worse...

Thanks again Chris!

-dj
http://www.fokust.com/gallery/album100
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Anytime!
 

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I agree! Chris has helped me out tremendously with info and advice regarding rebuilding the top end of my 97 M900, including new pistons and cylinder work. The only way I can repay him is by doing business with ca-cycleworks whenever I can, which I will make a point of doing as often as my wallet will allow. Thanks Chris. You wouldn't want to move your operation to the Phoenix, AZ metro area would you? Lots of Ducatis out here crying for another option to poor dealer service. Just a thought. :D
 
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Nice work, how difficult was it to install the pistons? I need to get a bit more power from my m900 and I have already put on the 41mm carbs. Also what did you pay for the parts, and was it worth it?
 

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The pistons were real simple. Pull the head, pull the cylinder, replace piston, re-install. You have to be careful though. I snapped one of the rings using my ring compressor. Turns out it's easier to install the piston just by gently working the rings in with your fingers.

While I had everything apart I did some cleaning, as well as replaced all of the O-rings, gaskets, and belts. I wish I had a sand blaster for the head, but carb cleaner worked just fine. ;)

Now,the friggin studs were a whole 'nother mess. Previous owner had overtightened the horizontal cylinder studs and I had to re-tap one and helicoil another.
 

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If your question was directed to me, it wasn't that bad of a job. The cylinders needed to be cleaned up, re-coated and honed to fit the new FBF 11:1 pistons. Things come apart fairly easily and a good manual (Haynes or whatever) helps a lot and has all the torque specs and such that you'll need. It also gave me the opportunity to "practice" on the valves with the heads off the bike and I now feel very confident adjusting my own valves. You'll need some special tools like a head nut tool and torque wrench, as well as a top end gasket set that comes with all the o-rings, gaskets and such. A couple exhaust port gaskets will be required as well. Reassembly was painless as long as you take your time and check and double check what you're doing. I installed the pistons in the cylinders using a ring compressor before I installed the cylinders on the bike and I didn't have any problems with the rings. If you have the cylinders worked on (re-coated) you'll need the steel "freeze" plugs (3 per cylinder) that seal up the oil galleys in the top of the cylinder. You can get those from any dealer (?), I'd recommend Ducati of Seattle. I'd recommend replacing the belts while you're at it (it's an easy job as long as you're there). The decisions you'll have to make include what pistons/cylinder combination to go for; stock, high comp pistons and stock bore, or a big bore kit. There are several options with regard to pistons and big bore kits, you'll just need to shop/ask around and dicide what you want to do. I suppose the whole job (pistons, cylinders and gaskets) ran me around $600. You can do the big bore thing for a little more than that. Of course this is assuming you do the work yourself. At $65-$80 an hour the cost of the job will go way up if you have someone else (dealer or whoever) do it. Have fun.
 
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