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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi All,

Has anyone had a problem with the fuel pump on a similar bike? Brought it in to the shop after the bike quit on me a few times and finally would not re-start. They say it is the wiring that is part of the fuel pump assembly and can not be fixed; just replaced. The entire assembly is $1100(!?!?) and only comes from Italy... does anyone know of another source for this part? Anyone parting out an S2R 1K. Ideas/comments/suggestions?

Thanks

Pierre (FLMonsterS2R1K)
 

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It seems like a broken wire should be repairable, you can even get a pump at Desmo Times for $150 so there are options other than replacing the whole assembly. Did the dealer show you where it's broken?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The bad wire is inside the actual assembly and can not be accessed, or at least not in a safe way to be worth putting back inside the gas tank and feeling good about it.
 

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Follow up? Pump Wire

So my dealer called me last week and I had this exact issue come up. They said they had /can replace the wire in the pump and also mentioned the price of a new pump was 1,000-1,100. Same exact story and same make/year of bike.

I am still waiting to pick it up but was curious to your outcome???

FYI - CA California Cycle Works sells one for 149.00 and they say is exact spec to the OEM unit. The pump and plate etc..

Here is the link {there is also a high pressure version for the racing bike}:
http://www.ca-cycleworks.com/ca-cycleworks-efi-fuel-pump-fuel-pumps
 

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I have the same problem on my 2007 S2R 1000! it appears to be the wiring in the flange assembly NOT the pump it self!! I was also told the fix is an entire new assembly for$1100. Does anyone know if the flange assembly can be dismantles and the faulty wire replaced, it appears to be held together by small circular clips that may be damaged when pried off!
any comments would be appreciated :)
 

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Just got a call as well for my 2006 S2R, want to throw up after getting that call and doing my 6k maintenance too lol I'm not sure what to do, $1100 and wait...
 

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Picked up an entire pump/flange assembly off a 2006 696 same part! works great :)
 

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checked ebay and found 2 listed, 1 was $725 and the other $279 for 2007 S2R1000 with 2200mi. I bought it right on the spot and have to call the dealership where my bike is and hopefully they will agree to install the used part. I'm crossing my fingers! Thanks for the help, much appreciated!!
 

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The fuel pump wires are epoxy potted in the fuel level sensor assembly, it is this part that you are being quoted for. I have heard of the epoxy being dug out and re-potted.
 

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fuel pump

Just repaired '07 S4rs, would start and idle(poorly), very little power. Checked fuel pressure, was 15 psi, should be 45. Removed pump and found plastic fuel filter had cracked at seam, replaced with metal NAPA gold filter. Pressure where it should be and running great. Don't see any reason why wiring could not be repaired. Aftermarket pumps are available.
 

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Ya... I have had the same problem... And as far as i can tell $1100 IS FAR TOO MUCH... So i have come up with my own repair and it works great. At a fraction of the cost. Hit me up... I can do the repair for you or if you are mechanical, i can help you with the repair. Its up to you. Thanks for listening.
 

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I ride an 05 S2R. I noticed a gas smell and have traced it to the wiring for the fuel pump. Interestingly it shows up in the plug for the four wires to the internal pump that plugs to the main harness. Anyone ever see this?


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

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only one fix currently

It's true, the only fix is to buy the whole assembly from Ducati. It's not something that can be repaired, only replaced. I've been following this now since the recall went out on the plastic tanks (maybe two years ogo?). I didn't think that it affected my 05 620 but then one day in August 2013 I was hailing tail up the 15 on my way to Rancho Cucamonga and it just cut out. I was stranded. My bike has been out of commision ever since.

See, the failure is rarely to do with the pump and yes, wires can be replaced but it's not like that. The failure is potted (epoxied) inside of another part. To access the broken connection means to destroy the part. Yikes! I know.

Others have tried and failed, usually resulting in leaking fuel. Currently, the best thing that you can do is to find a used fuel flange on eBay but good luck with that. They are really rare. I even tried to find used tanks, figuring that maybe the seller didn't know what they had and possibly I could find a tank with the complete fuel flange and take what I need. Most people are too savvy for that, I guess.

I hate not having my ride and double hate when things are broken, and triple hate when people tell me that there's no other way. Well there's always a way so I'm just going for it. Keep you posted?
 

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It looks like Ca Cycleworks is still working on this. I had a conversation with them once I suspected that this fitting was the problem. They had a solution on their website through last year but because of failures were not offering it for sale while they worked out the bugs.
Meantime we're still left with trying to find a used one. This seems to work for some but it seems to me that they are all made the same so why replace a failed part with a soon-to-fail part. It doesn't fix anything only temporarily patches the problem.
 

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I'm thinking that I've come up with a better bung than factory. I've been doing a lot of research on this, talking to chemical/adhesives companies about coatings that can survive gasoline/ethanol immersion.
I've simplified the design, no solder connections to fail. I'm pretty close to something that will get my bike running again. I'll post pics when I get closer.
 

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Subscribed... I have an 07 695 with the same problem. I replaced the wire with the CA Cycleworks wiring flange last year and it worked great, but now I pulled the bike out of storage and found that it is leaking :(. Add me to the list of people looking for a new solution without having to pay $1,000 for a new unit.
 

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How to fix intermittent fuel pump issues due to failed wiring.

I referenced this site for ideas when I was having trouble with my fuel pump, so I thought I'd post a walkthrough.

I bought the bike used (2006 Monster S2R 1000) and rode for about 8 months without issues. Then, started having intermittent fuel pump outages. I first checked all the exposed wiring for either an open connection or a short. Eventually ended up digging through forums, eliminating the easy-to-check suggestions, and finally decided to pull the pump. Below is a walkthrough of my repair. With exception to the 6 hour cure time for the epoxy, the work itself shouldn't be more than a couple hours.

START

1. Disconnect power to the fuel pump by unplugging the 4 prong plug.

2. Drain the tank. I used the $3 hand pump siphon from the auto store. Pumped it down as low as I reasonably could. Saved the gas, of course.

3. Once the fuel level is low enough, tilt the tank on it's side to keep remaining fuel away from fuel pump flange.

4. Remove the pump. Pull the 6 screws to remove the fuel pump. Once the pump was removed, I went ahead and pumped the remaining gas out of the tank to avoid breathing it in as it evaporated. This was the first time I had pulled the fuel pump on this bike. If you haven't seen it before, here's a picture.



5. Once the pump is pulled, check the resistance of the red wire across the epoxy joint. I connected the terminals to the red connection outside the tank and probed the red connector on the inside of the tank. The resistance on the ohm-meter indicated low resistance (~ 3 ohms), as it should; however, when I tugged or twisted on the red wire from the inside of the tank, the resistance spiked to several hundred times, indicating the wire was making poor contact somewhere in the epoxy joint. If the resistance reads abnormally high while messing with the red wire, you likely have the same issue.

6. After confirming you have a connection problem, you'll need to remove the plastic fuel pump fairing pieces (the fuel level sensor and a larger black fairing piece) to access the epoxy joint. There are several little steel clips holding the parts together. I carefully slid the clips off with a small screw driver so I could reuse them. I bent a couple during removal, but just smacked them flat again with a hammer.

7. Once you have access to the epoxy joint, dig through the epoxy for the wire union. I used a small screw driver to dig the epoxy away from the red wire, while being careful not to interfere with the other three wires. Down about 1/2", at the end of the red wire, I ran into a poorly soldered joint. The wire was easily pulled out of the joint. Below is an image of the small hole in the union along side the red wire with the poorly laid solder still on it. I fortunately didn't have to dig all the way through the epoxy. That way, even if my epoxy patch job were inadequate, I still have the original seal to prevent any new fuel leaks.



8. With the soldering iron, I first burned off the old solder at the end of the red wire. Then, stuck the red wire back into the port and resoldered the joint. As you can see from the image, I soldered the hell out of it. I left a blob of solder large enough for the epoxy to hold onto it and keep the joint from wiggling loose. Maybe overkill.

9. After soldering your joint, be sure to check the resistance of the red wire across the epoxy joint again and tug lightly on the wire to ensure you have a good weld.



10. Prepare the area for new epoxy. I blew out the area and zip tied the wires together to hold them in position while the epoxy sets. After a little research, I confirmed that both JB Weld and JB Kwik are gas and oil resistant after curing; however, they both prefer a dry, non-oily surface until cured. I didn't need the high strength and temperature tolerance of original JB Weld, so I used JB Kwik. After filling in the hole, I poked at it with a tooth pick to work the JB into the cracks. Then, let it sit for the full 6 hour cure time.



11. Once cured, put the fuel pump back together. I used a little grease on the o-ring for the fuel level sensor to help slide it back into place. To push the clips back onto the posts, I used a small socket to push them down evenly (maybe 10mm for the big ones and 6 for the small ones ?) Don't forget to reconnect all the plugs and any stray ground wires (one ground goes to the fuel filter, the other to the fuel level sensor). NOTE: this isn't a bad time to replace the fuel filter, if you're due.

12. Reinstall the fuel pump assembly in the tank and tighten the 6 bolts incrementally to ensure the flange seats properly. Be sure to put fuel back in the tank before you turn the key. You don't want to run the pump dry.

END

It'll probably take a few more successful rides before I fully trust the bike again, but so far, I haven't had any issues.
 
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