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Warning, about to get on my soap box.
This is nothing personal, it goes out to all new riders with 6 hours experience and a checkbook.
New riders need to get this idea that 700cc (or 800cc!) bikes are suitable for their first bike.
To quote someone on this forum (can't remember who) "learn your craft on a smaller bike, then once you have the skills, move up to a bigger bike". Get a small, cheap enduro or an old 450 nighthawk, or something similar and really learn to ride, even if you just keep it one season. Most new riders end up dumping their bikes sometime in that first season, why would you want the bike that you're damaging to be a brand new $10,000Ducati?

They don't let new pilots fly jumbo jets, they have to start out in a 2 seat Cessna. I would love to see a 500cc limit for the first 2 years that you have your motorcycle license.

Just because you made it through an afternoon of riding a small bike in a parking lot, doesn't make you ready to be turned loose on the roads with an 80+ horsepower motorcycle.


End of rant, enjoy your new Ducati.
 

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I would love to see a 500cc limit for the first 2 years that you have your motorcycle license.
I would love to see more 500cc bikes available, period. I have nothing against smaller engines. I love lighter bikes. I just wish there were more to choose from.
 

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Warning, about to get on my soap box.




Just because you made it through an afternoon of riding a small bike in a parking lot, doesn't make you ready to be turned loose on the roads with an 80+ horsepower motorcycle.


After riding smaller bikes and scooters for years I got a Monster 695 as my first big bike, but I had the 33bhp restriction on. The dealership basically puts a small widget on the throttle so it will only open a bit. This meant I could ride and get used to a big machine without having all the top end speed. You still get all the power up to about 80 mph and then it just won't go any faster. I rode like that for 6 months and then had it removed and was able to adjust instantly to the extra oomph. Going from a smaller machine to a bigger you have to get used to the weight, handling, better brakes etc.. and that can as dangerous as the extra power. The 695 or 696 are not a rip your arms off torque Monster but they are pretty fast and the restricter can just help ease you in, it worked for me, I now have a M796 and bloody love it.

sf
 

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First, love my 696...wish I didn't have the mechanical problems I've had but still love the bike.

Do I think everyone should start out on a lower cc bike first...well some people yes but I would think a majority of us it doesn't matter a whole lot. Myself, I started on an 1100 and have bounced around since. Truth is, the speed limit and for that matter your limits are the same no matter how much horse power you have. I have a 250 (27hp) and an Fz1 (120hp), yet I ride them both the same speed...heck I may even ride the 250 faster. The key here is just being responsible and riding your ride.

As for my 696. Well I love the look and the fact that it's a Ducati. Handling is much like my 250, so it'll cut corners and you can almost drive it with your knees or just by leaning. My bar risers (when they get here) will hopefully make the huge difference in riding position that I'm looking for. Breaks are pretty good, although with the name Brembo on the side I just always expect more. I actually like the low seat height and lightness of the bike, it's amazing how great it is to be able to back your bike up not on your toes. Also I'm a huge fan of the Monster Art, although I wish their designers were more creative. It's just awesome to be able to change the plastics rather than pulling everything off and repainting, I wish this would catch on with more manufactures.

Overall it's not the greatest bike I've ever ridden, sorry Ducati. Although, it one of the most exciting bikes I've ridden and it'll always be my favorite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Warning, about to get on my soap box.
This is nothing personal, it goes out to all new riders with 6 hours experience and a checkbook.
New riders need to get this idea that 700cc (or 800cc!) bikes are suitable for their first bike.
To quote someone on this forum (can't remember who) "learn your craft on a smaller bike, then once you have the skills, move up to a bigger bike". Get a small, cheap enduro or an old 450 nighthawk, or something similar and really learn to ride, even if you just keep it one season. Most new riders end up dumping their bikes sometime in that first season, why would you want the bike that you're damaging to be a brand new $10,000Ducati?

They don't let new pilots fly jumbo jets, they have to start out in a 2 seat Cessna. I would love to see a 500cc limit for the first 2 years that you have your motorcycle license.

Just because you made it through an afternoon of riding a small bike in a parking lot, doesn't make you ready to be turned loose on the roads with an 80+ horsepower motorcycle.


End of rant, enjoy your new Ducati.


LOL Ill get the smaller Monster, and I will definately enjoy.....
 

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I would love to see more 500cc bikes available, period. I have nothing against smaller engines. I love lighter bikes. I just wish there were more to choose from.
Amen. I'd love to see the Borile come to the States.
 

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I love mine. It's the best thing I've ever done for myself.

It's fast, it's easy to ride (with the exception of a clutch engagement that is at times a bit wonky), it's smooth. Looks fantastic, sounds fantastic especially on the overrun.

I would buy another in a second.
 

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I've had mine for 18 months now and its still puts a grin on my face when I ride. Like Boris said, its not the greatest bike but the funnest bike due to its lightweight and power output. Components such as brakes and suspension are better quality than the typical Japanese entry level bike. It has a better ride quality than the SV650 but the SV has a nicer engine.

Things I do not like:
The plastic tank prevents the use of magnetic tank bag.
The battery is deep inside the bike so it took me 2 hrs to access the battery to attach a tender.
Parts are more expensive than the Japanese equivalent
Maintenance (valve adjustments) are more expensive and more frequent
Mirrors vibe when riding and replacement was necessary. They use an 8mm thread so i had to get an adapter for new mirrors
The seat slopes forward and crushes your family jewels when riding. I bought the touring seat which solves the problem.

Lastly: Once you buy this bike, you'll undoubtedly buy a lot of accessories to customize it so take that additional $1000 or $2000 into account. It may allow you to buy a more expensive bike. (I spent about $1500 on accessories during that period).
 
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