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Hello All,

I'm new to this board, and recently purchased my first Ducati, a beautiful black 750 Monster.

I am planning on making this bike either my daily commuter or my weekend track bike. The only way I will turn this bike into a track bike is if it can be competitive with the Suzuki SV650s that heavily populate the light weight class at the track.

Since I never ridden a SV650 or raced against one, I was wondering if any of you Monster owners know if riders being equal, will the 750M be able to hold it's own on the track with the Suzuki?
 

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I'll be able to tell you soon since I ride a 1999 M750 too, and my friend just recently bought a 2004 Suzuki SV650.
 

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With equal riders, I would expect the SV650 to be faster on a race track. There's gotta be other discussions on this subject, but I'm too lazy to do a search for them too.
 

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I believe there is about a 10hp difference between the 2, with the SV650 having more power. It is probably easier and cheaper to fix and find parts for the SV650 in the event of a track mishap, too.
 

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I agree w/ Scott and kevdusmc. If you really want a Ducati track bike (assume by your concern about SV650s, that you mean a race bike), you're probably better off starting w/ an SS than a Monster.
 
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Thanks for the replies guys. I've only been riding for about 1 year and really wanted to try out amateur road racing.

I bought my bike because I consider myself still at the beginner-intermediate level and thought it could eventually be a good light weight racer.

Even if the SVs have an advantage I'll probably end up turning my 750 Monster into a track bike and giving it a go at the track!
 

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I street ride with a guy who has a SV650 alot. My M750 with mods smokes him out of the hole, but he catches up fast.

The 900SS suggestion is good. I'm currently working on a 900SS with lots of lightened rotating parts that should do OK against the SVs at the local track. On a more open track, I think the SVs probably still have the advantage.

--Fillmore
 
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Which bike is more fun to ride?

Make that one your daily commuter. You will be riding that a lot more.

Juat my .02.

Tom.
 

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Bit different but...

I had an SV400S (Identical to a SV650S aprt from the engine) and moved to a monster M1000. I have no race track experience, but do go quick on the road.

Handling

The suzuki had soft suspension but was small and handled well overall due to its light weight.

I think if we are talking of speeds around 100mph and the SV guy sorted his suspension, a monster couldn't really compete primarily because of the lack of cowl which can lead to weaving and the rider spends their time concentrating on staying in control rather than riding faster.

Engine

I believe super bike magazine UK did a test and the SV650 had pretty similar engine performance to a M800 in the test. The SV650 was peakier with power at higher revs. A M800 has a lot more power that a M750.

Conclusion

Buy a Supersport SS800 if you want to be competative.

In may experience however there is a huge margin of error just due to rider ability. I can well imagine a well ridden M750 beating a poorly ridden SV650 on the street. On a race track maybe a different story.

stu
 

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Hold on a second... I dont understand. I thought that the monster, and the Supersport had the exact same engine.
Why do you guys keep suggesting that he buy an SS instead of a monster if it is the exact same speed?

I always thought of the SS as a monster with a different (worse) look. Another way I looked at them was a weaker/cheaper version of the superbikes. Is that wrong?
 

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Hold on a second... I dont understand. I thought that the monster, and the Supersport had the exact same engine.
Why do you guys keep suggesting that he buy an SS instead of a monster if it is the exact same speed?

I always thought of the SS as a monster with a different (worse) look. Another way I looked at them was a weaker/cheaper version of the superbikes. Is that wrong?
Motor is not everything. Handling, IMHO, makes the primary difference in how you get around a set of bends. The SS (newer ones at least) feel like a more stable platform and have oodles more ground clearance than the Monster. SS has a different frame and a different geometry numbers. Just my experiences riding SS's and monsters of diff types back to back on trackdays (it's nice to have good duc riding buddies:D).

It takes a lot of cash and effort to setup a Monster to be a full out race-bike. (rearsets, clipons, exhaust header mods, suspension).

Not discouraging you, but just wanted you to be aware of what you're getting into. A good handful on this list race monsters, and they can share their experiences with you. That being said, if you're racing for fun, ride the bike that'll make you giggle like schoolgirl. ;)
 

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Well said. That was my point as well. If you want a Ducati as a track bike, an SS is a better place to start than a Monster. For many tracks and many riders, an SS will provide similar lap times to a Superbike. As all have said, its the rider. I just did a track day and was continually lapping a guy w/ a 749S. I'm decent but not ultra fast and the 749 guy was pitiful in the turns.

My instructor had an SS800 track bike that weighed 360 pounds wet and made 84 HP at the rear wheel. So an SS can be a great track ride.

Motor is not everything.
 

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Both are based on the Trellis frame.
Shooot and I thought they were aluminum twinspar deltabox frames! :-*

They're not based on "the Trellis frame". They ARE steel trellis frames. I meant those frame tubes are constructed in a different fashion. From SS to M you still know you're on a duc. Just a bit different is all.

Fastbike, was your instructor Fred Olsen at NHIS by chance? Heck of guy. He was my instructor during the last BCM Monster Day.
 

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Nope, was Mike Dube (and his Dubati). Also a great guy. That's one of the great things about a BCM track day, pretty much everyone is "good people".

You doin' Monster Day this year? I decided to treat myself and do all of the BCM track days.
Shooot and I thought they were aluminum twinspar deltabox frames!
 

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They're actually both race teammates I believe! Fred gave me the addy to his site. www.ourduck.com

No monster Day for me this year, I'm afraid. My M600 is actually in some scrap heap right now =( I lowsided on the street last year, and then an SUV "clipped" it. Amazing what 5000lb does to 390lbs...

Though the replacement is the granddaddy of the monster!... 851 =). I'll try to do some other BCM days. Come up introduce yourself if you see a red 851 =).
 

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If you are hooked on racing a Duc, then I agree with the others that the stock SS is more suitable for the track compared to a stock Monster. If you want to streetride also and are keen on a Monster, get the Monster and treat it as a streetbike. If you wanna race, suck it up and buy a used SV-650, tear off all the lights and wire up all the nuts and bolts and use it as a track-only bike. This may sound more expensive to start (two bikes), but it will be much cheaper in long run. Ducati's are relatively expensive to repair(and if you race it, it will need repairing), especially compared to SV-650's which are very popular on race track and you can find spare parts for easily. Then when the day come's and you wad the SV-650 up in some corner and bust it up bad, you'll still have a streetbike to ride until your track bike is fixed.

You don't want to be tentative on race day and you probably will if you're racing your only streetbike.

Good luck!
 

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I'm not really so much interested in 'racing.' I just wanted to try to expand my skill a little bit by riding on a track.

I don't really want to have to make any major mods, and I am not sure if insurance covers track use. Does it?

Can someone tell me if I am being unreasonable trying to practice riding on a track without a 'track' bike?
 

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You dont need a "track" bike to practice on a track. Most of the "track" bikes you see for sale on Ebay or in the autotrader are just being called track bikes cause they cannot be registered (usually due to the engine and frame numbers not matching, stolen parts) I know alot of people who ride their everyday bikes at the track all the time. I think If you get a monster and really want to go fast at the track you will just need some clip ons and rear sets. Maybe not even the clip ons. You just jack up the rear ride height as high as it will go.
If its your first year riding I doubt you are dragging your knee or really getting the bike that far over yet. If as you get better you start to scratch your pipes, get a set of high mounts. You dont have to buy all this stuff right away to start going to the track. Just go with it in stock trim and see how you do, then start doing mods as you get the money.
 

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Will do. ;)

SeattleStallion: If the track day is run as a "riding school", most insurance companies will cover any damage. I do several track days a year with my street bike. Best place to improve your riding.

They're actually both race teammates I believe!
 
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