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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone having trouble with their rear brakes on the new 821. Mine are hard as a rock but will not stop. Been to first service in Scotsdale Ducati and they said all is well. I can tell you all is not well. I have had 10-11 Ducs from 907, monsters, St2,916,multistradas and they all had good rear brakes. I really just use them in parking lots and coming to a slow stop. You get real scared when you push down and nothing happens. It has ABS and you can get front and rear to modulate but the rear suck in a normal stop.
 

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I would bleed them a couple of times and if you still have a problem, take the bike back to the dealer.
Not sure about the Ducati ABS system, but if air is in the ABS pump you would usually get a mushy pedal, but something is wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't believe there is any air in the rear brakes because the pedal is so hard. I'm going to remove the rear caliper to see if there are any obstructions not allowing the pads to squeeze. This is definitely a safety problem and the dealer says they are like any other ducatis. You all know that you can slow the bike pretty well with the rear brakes. BTW I do use the front brakes very hard.
 

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I am completely new to Ducati's and just got the same bike and mine is exactly the same as you describe. Stiff but not a whole lot of bite when stopping with just rear. Front one bites like a motherfucker though.
 

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This morning I took off the rear caliper to check its operation. Nothing binding, pistons move in and out. I wonder if it maybe wrong pad material or master is too small to make the correct pressure. Next time we are in Phoenix I want to ride another 821 or a 1200 and check the brakes.
 

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I think this is normal. My 1200S's rear brake is all but useless as well. A huge stomp barely slows the bike. I can feel the difference when I use it in conjunction with the front brake as opposed to front only though.
 

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It is a design flaw. All the bleeding and messing with it in the world won't fix it.

New pads or a better caliper or master cylinder might fix it, but pretty much everyone including all the reviewers said the rear brake sucks on the new monsters.
 

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Design flaw when talking about brakes should warrant a recall ASAP. Have any of the 821 / 1200 taken the pedal / caliper off and see what could be the problem? BMW R1200S had an almost non functioning rear brake and someone took the pedal /caliper off and found that the caliper worked as other Been no calipers so he started looking at the pedal. He replaced the pivot the pedal rotated on with one of a different metal and moved the location of the return spring and problem was solved.
Googl BMW R1200S REAR BRAKE PROBLEM and it should take you to the Pelican Parts R1200S site.
 

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I just totaled my 2015 Monster 821 last night after the rear brakes failed on my hard. I've had my Ducati for about a year and I only noticed the rear brakes not biting for the past two weeks since the weather has gotten a bit better here in Jersey. I'm pretty happy to be alive...but WTF...
 

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Hi all.. I am also experiencing rear brake set not being performing like how it should be. Braking needed to be forceful. Braking "normally" like how i did on other bike will not slow down the monster 821 at all.

This is a safety concern as I almost had a near collision due to unresponsive rear braking. Do your local dealer help anything?
 

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How many miles does the bike have? My 2014 M1200 had a useless rear brake like you describe (firm pedal but barely slows the bike down) for the first 1,000 miles or so then just kept getting better. I have 10.5K now and the rear brake is excellent. I have never had a soft pedal or any other issues as some owners on here have reported. It sucked at first but then came good.
 

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I use my rear brake about 1% of the total time I ride. I can't see how a rear brake, or lack there of, could cause someone to "total out" their bike unless they aren't familiar with riding. I'm not trying to beat you down when I say that but if you were about to panic stop using the rear brake you'd have been **** out of luck anyways when the tire locked up and you just went sliding along.

The only thing I use the rear brake for is trailing the rear tire through a wicked twistie, that way I can trail it to control the bike then stomp on the pedal to cause the bike to become more upright at the exit. My 900SS hasn't had a working rear brake in 2 years. I'm not bragging or trying to boast with that comment. It's just that I replaced the pads and bled the unit. The brakes came back to life for about 2 rides then faded out again. I then tore the caliper apart and cleaned it, then I replaced the master cylinder with a new one. Again the brakes were good for about 2 rides and then went completely soft again. Haven't touched them again since.
 

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This is bugging me as well. I've had a bunch of ducatis and this is the only one with a rear brake problem. I've bled the rear twice and the pedal definitely feels hard so it doesn't seem like it's air just doesn't slow the bike down too well. I've read the proper procedure is to take the caliper off and either raise it or rest it on the top side of the rotor and bleed it that way, anyone try this?
 

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Radracer6, I've been told the same thing from my mechanic - that is, that the caliper needs to be raised above the brake fluid reservoir when bleeding the brake. Appearantly without doing that an air pocket can remain in the caliper because of how it sits on the swing arm in relation to how to fluid flows through the caliper during the bleed (I'm not doing a good job of explaining it).

At any rate, when I do that (and when I let the mechanic do it too) the rear brake feels a bit better, but it still sucks. I also have a Ducati Scrambler Italia Independant and the rear brake on that bike is super.

My dealer seems to think this is just a part of owning an 821 (he says the same issue is not appearant on the 1200 because the caliper is held differently on the swing arm), and says everyone who owns one comes in to have it bled once or twice a season. That seems kinda goofy to me.

So, my question is this: If there seems to be no great way to get the rear brake on the 821 to work well can anyone here suggest whether or not a new, different brake caliper might work, and what specific caliper they'd then recommend?

I know the rear brake isn't as 'important' as the front one, and I don't use it much, but the thing is when I do want to use it I REALLY want to use it (think gravel corner and I can feel the front starting to slip out when I apply the front brake), and regardless, the bike has two brakes; they should really both work.
 

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Try a reverse bleed so you push the fluid from the caliper to the reservoir. Aprilia's are known for the same issue with the caliper mounted above the swing arm.
 

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How much of a pita is it to get the caliper off? Does anyone know? Just by looking at it looks like the brake mine is behind a cover and a few tiger things.
 

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I've had a 2015 821 stripe for about month now, I have put about a 1000 miles on it with the stock pads, never been bleed etc. Total mileage is 3300. While the rear brake is somewhat wimpy its is far from non functional. I personally think it's intentional for the type of bike, being a short wheel base naked bike where due the height and weight shift, especially in a hard stop the rear is simple not going to contribute much to overall braking at all with the real good front brakes. I find it fine for trail braking, added control during hard stops, and for low speed u-turns, low traction situations and such and having a real strong touchy rear brake for the most part on a bike like this is a detriment. It's certainly strong enough to skid the rear tire and kick in the ABS if you give a little effort on the brake pedal and it's just not touchy. On another one of my bikes, a 2015 Victory Cross Country, being of long wheel base and 800 lbs, the rear brake contributes a lot lot more to the overall braking of the bike.
 

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Just to report back. Taking the caliper off and flipping it upside down to bleed it worked for me. A lot better rear brake now in terms of feel and bite
 
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