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Hi campers,
I'm looking at a used 2014 1200S, and was looking for some assistance in checking it over. It's got about 3000 miles on it.

- the tires look ok, and I can't feel any squaring on the rear, but knowing the tires that are on it I'm anticipating they'll need replacing soon

- just pulling the clutch in, it felt really heavy to me. Like, a three finger minimum kinda job. And there's no breakover point, which seemed odd... the pull is basically heavy all the way through the stroke. I gather this might be normal, but I wanted to check. I'm sure it's partially me, as I've been riding 2 stroke trials bike for the last 4 years, and the clutches are feather light. Time to reprogram the clutch finger/hand.

- anything specific to the 2014 I should be wary of or inquire about? From what I'm told by the owner, there have been no issues with the bike. The dealer did the first service and since then its just had annual oil changes. It's got some nicely done modifications (rizoma front turn signals and mirrors, integrated rear light/blinkers, a few other things).

Thanks for any info.
 

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I've got a 2015 m821...I think the 1200 is really sorted and the only thing that comes to mind as problematic is the throttle unit...it doesn't effect everyone but your early enough in the model range that I would just watch it...if you can change rider modes than it's fine...but one day when your out riding and it throws an err message and slams you in nanny mode; try changing the rider modes before you turn it off...if you can't...turn the bike off then turn it back on and go order a new one...it's a simple fix...my replacement has been faultless some 40k miles with it.. just something to aware of...the ohlins up front I think came standard with 8.5 springs, at least the set I bought for mine did...unless your 150lbs plan on some new ones

I rarely see any issues pop up here for the 1200




https://youtu.be/69LrQ-LnMwc
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I have a 2014 1200 base model.
Back brakes tend to suck, this is typical.
Need to use a firm boot to try and avoid false neutrals, also typical.
Mine felt better after 10,000 miles.
You will be wanting tires. Should probably change hydraulic fluids.
Timing belts are supposed to be changed every 5 years.
2019 - 2014 = time to change.
So budget some $$$ for that.

I love mine. :grin
 

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I've enjoyed 10K trouble free miles other than once when the odometer showed "-----". A 10 minute stint at the dealership fixed it.

The clutch feels the way it does because it's a hydraulic clutch so there's no over-center feel. And yeah, rear brake is useful only when on perfectly level ground, devoid of wind and already stopped. Under those circumstances with the rear brake applied your Monster probably won't roll away.

Enjoy and be safe!
 

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You're going to love this beast of a bike! Yes the hydraulic clutch might take a bit to get used to.
 

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As previous members stated the biggest issue with the M1200 (all years and models) are the rear brakes. The issue also affects the Multistrata's as well. The issue of the rear brake is the hose routing. It's so close to the engine and exhaust that the fluid is super heated and sucks air in. Add the fact that the caliper is located on the lower portion of the wheel (6 O'Clock) using the bleeder valve is useless to remove the air from the line as the valve is located at the lowest point of the line. So you have to pull the caliper off to properly bleed the line. Even so... expect to do this once a year.

Video explaining the problem.


SuperDave Demers of DesmoTec has supposedly found a fix, but it does require accessing the ABS unit.

https://desmotec.ca/

Outside of that, no real regular issues.
 

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Regarding the rear brake...it's solve able...I think the multi was the first to utilize the Bosch abs system and was a steep learning curve to get it bled properly...it is tricky and will take multiple attempts to purge the air from the abs unit...but once it's gone it's gone...my pedal is still firm (bleed every 2 mo) and haven't taken the caliper off the bike since it was sorted....it's easier to introduce air into the system than purging it out...once you stumble on the technique it's pretty straightforward

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But your pedal is still firm because you perform a maintenance to the rear brake system every 2 months. Do you still pull the caliper off to elevate it when bleeding? If so, then that's far from solved. If you don't, what do you think would happen if you didn't bleed the system every 2 months?

I'm just not convinced the problem can get resolved unless you reroute the brake line going from the ABS system to the rear master cylinder. Once you can keep the heat away from that line, I would surmise you could go a year if not more without requiring to bleed the line.

But it's hypothetical until tried.

I do however know, SuperDave Demers of Desmotec does say he has a real FIX to the problem, what it entails I have no real clue. I am very curious to getting it done to my bike as I'm tired of bleeding the dam line. I'll post my results if I ever get it done... and if I remember... lol..
 

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But your pedal is still firm because you perform a maintenance to the rear brake system every 2 months. Do you still pull the caliper off to elevate it when bleeding? If so, then that's far from solved. If you don't, what do you think would happen if you didn't bleed the system every 2 months?



I'm just not convinced the problem can get resolved unless you reroute the brake line going from the ABS system to the rear master cylinder. Once you can keep the heat away from that line, I would surmise you could go a year if not more without requiring to bleed the line.



But it's hypothetical until tried.



I do however know, SuperDave Demers of Desmotec does say he has a real FIX to the problem, what it entails I have no real clue. I am very curious to getting it done to my bike as I'm tired of bleeding the dam line. I'll post my results if I ever get it done... and if I remember... lol..
Bled with caliper on bike...air in the abs unit aside.. technique plays a big role...I'll prove it in reverse...pedal spongy? Try opening and closing the bleed line without any pedal pressure... instantly worse...air entry #1....bleed fluid beyond the min line.... instantly worse ...air entry #2...these then go in to become trapped in the caliper and the abs pump itself....air entry #3...it's not as easy as you thought and takes a certain level of speed and precision to get it right....then you need to trip the abs pump and do it all over again and again....there's a large margin for error...and I haven't found any shortcuts....pedal down...bleed open...bleed close before complete pedal stroke....repeat...watch level....ride the abs and repeat....I bleed the fronts every 2 mo because if not I'll die....rears are just part of the routine.... essentially running a reservoir full through it

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Bughaboo, I understand this completely, but what you're saying is applicable to every brake system in existence. My statement is that there is an inherent design flaw with the rear brake line routing which accelerates the entry of air into the hydraulic circuit.

Your regiment could possibly take all the air out of the line perfectly and for good. However, we don't know this for a fact because your need to have a working back brake (as do I) so you don't give it a chance to fail and preemptively remove any possible air. So in essence like me you don't have faith in the way Ducati made the back brake hydraulic circuit and compensate by bleeding the line every 2 months, which I believe you shouldn't have to do.

I've had plenty of bikes with brake fluid that went black but never once lost line pressure because air never got into the line in sufficient quantities (yes I was young and dumb). I've read of people paying for some super high priced brake fluid (Castrol SRF racing brake fluid at $95 for a bottle 1L bottle [ame]https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000JL760C/ref=dp_olp_0?ie=UTF8&condition=all[/ame]) with a higher boiling point to try and mitigate the situation with these bikes. Yes it does work to a degree, but why should we have to go this route or do a by monthly gymnastics routine to make a rear brake work.. we shouldn't. That's all I was saying.

Cheers.
 

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Bughaboo, I understand this completely, but what you're saying is applicable to every brake system in existence. My statement is that there is an inherent design flaw with the rear brake line routing which accelerates the entry of air into the hydraulic circuit.



Your regiment could possibly take all the air out of the line perfectly and for good. However, we don't know this for a fact because your need to have a working back brake (as do I) so you don't give it a chance to fail and preemptively remove any possible air. So in essence like me you don't have faith in the way Ducati made the back brake hydraulic circuit and compensate by bleeding the line every 2 months, which I believe you shouldn't have to do.



I've had plenty of bikes with brake fluid that went black but never once lost line pressure because air never got into the line in sufficient quantities (yes I was young and dumb). I've read of people paying for some super high priced brake fluid (Castrol SRF racing brake fluid at $95 for a bottle 1L bottle https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000JL760C/ref=dp_olp_0?ie=UTF8&condition=all) with a higher boiling point to try and mitigate the situation with these bikes. Yes it does work to a degree, but why should we have to go this route or do a by monthly gymnastics routine to make a rear brake work.. we shouldn't. That's all I was saying.



Cheers.
Admittedly it's a design conundrum...there's a separate chamber with a motor used for re-establishing the pressure in the brake line that is isolated and prohibitively difficult to bleed... but once air is freed from the chamber; normal bleeding procedures work...you won't get it right on the first attempt... probably not the second either...none of which help dispell any methodology to bleed it correctly which is why somewhere on the fifth attempt where people start taking note of what they are doing and perpetuate wild theories to the solution...it really is a palm to the face moment once the problems are addressed....if you objectively seek out the air re-entering you will see the essence of my statement/argument....that said...you absolutely have to remove the caliper to remove the last bit of air...once it's gone and steps are maintained to keep it out it's really a simple procedure

As to my 2 mo. Service interval ...I live in a horribly humid area and I love to wrench on my brakes into a corner...factor in great pressure differentials from altitude it's impossible to keep moisture out and you will notice your braking markers moving further and further from the corner...I just switched to motul 600f in an attempt to extend the interval....time will tell

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