Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When I first bought the bikes (used) it had a very very mushy rear break with almost no stopping power. I bled it a few times and got a little pressure but no where close to where it should be.

I just spent a few hours, bleeding the brake again. Then removing the caliber so it could be held above the ABS system, bled again, used a vacuum, reverse bleed, etc. I went through an entire bottle of motul in the process.

Still no feed back what so ever. Brake pedal is completely useless. Almost as it’s sucking air in one way or the other.

Any ideas before I throw away money by giving it to Ducati due to my impatience?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
1.remove caliper....squeeze pistons whilst removing fluid from reservoir
2.put something between pads to keep them open
3.connect tube to bleeder and press pedal to build pressure...open bleeder and close before pedal hits bottom
4.repeat until pedal becomes firm. be absolutely sure the level stays above the min mark in the reservoir and cycle through the fluid faster than a trapped air bubble....keep the bleed valve pointed up and continue until no air appears...than go a little more...be vigilant that the reservoir does not hit MIN and be quick with cycling...pedal down open close pedal up...repeat
if the pedal goes soft at any point there is still air in the system...a helper adding fluid will go along way...the pedal should tighten up rather quickly but don't stop and don't let the volume go below the min mark

with the pedal taught...seal it all up and go for a ride....ride the brake until the abs kicks in...and keep it up until the pedal turns to mush...then repeat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
icottier

I too had to have this done last year (by the dealer) after garaging over winter - apparently it affects most Ducati's with underslung calipers.

This year, I had the same issue, but I ratchet strapped the pedal down (not too tight) to a ground weight/anchor overnight to keep pressure on it and in the morning, all sorted :) Much easier than taking everything off
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
The rear brake on a Ducati Monster 1200 is simply a brake light switch. I've bled, changed fluid, replaced the pads with a more aggressive compound, scuffed the rotor with a Scotch-Brite pad and I've come to understand that on flat ground at a complete stop if I clamp on the rear brake the bike will probably not begin to roll away. In the end I've learned to front-brake like a demon!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
I've been dealing with this issue on my 1200R since new. After about a month the rear brake would go soft. Replaced with OEM master cylinder. Still would fail. Replaced Rear Caliper same. Finally replaced with a Brembo master cylinder and has been great for 5 months now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Mines still taught...but I can't stress the min mark enough...if you think that an air bubble will rise back into the reservoir if you drain it your wrong...put on a clear tube and see for yourself...if that bubble makes its way into the abs pump while engaged it gets stuck again...you can begin to see how the scenario perpetuates...

Air can be at the caliper and in the pump or in the line...pumping fluid at a steady pace clears the line ...angling the caliper up clears the caliper...ride it...engage the abs ...keep going until it's mush or annoyingly soft...repeat....keep the level up and push the fluid through the line fast enough that a rising air bubble still gets cleared...it sucks but it can be done...godspeed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
532 Posts
I only got what I considered decent rear brake feel after I used a pneumatic bleeder tool. I still had to remove the caliper assembly to get it to work properly, but even using a one-way check valve type tool did not give me the results I was looking for.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
678 Posts
Mines still taught...but I can't stress the min mark enough...if you think that an air bubble will rise back into the reservoir if you drain it your wrong...put on a clear tube and see for yourself...if that bubble makes its way into the abs pump while engaged it gets stuck again...you can begin to see how the scenario perpetuates...

Air can be at the caliper and in the pump or in the line...pumping fluid at a steady pace clears the line ...angling the caliper up clears the caliper...ride it...engage the abs ...keep going until it's mush or annoyingly soft...repeat....keep the level up and push the fluid through the line fast enough that a rising air bubble still gets cleared...it sucks but it can be done...godspeed
Thank you for the awesome suggestion. My rear brake was non existent. I took it out for an hour or two in Urban mode ABS 3 (the highest intervention) and repeatedly hammered it. Pumping the rear brake over and over again at multiple speeds triggering the ABS. Rear brake now works. Very hard to qualify if it's at 100% but it's acceptable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
Thank you for the awesome suggestion. My rear brake was non existent. I took it out for an hour or two in Urban mode ABS 3 (the highest intervention) and repeatedly hammered it. Pumping the rear brake over and over again at multiple speeds triggering the ABS. Rear brake now works. Very hard to qualify if it's at 100% but it's acceptable.
There needs to be some sort of merit badge for this task... Everyone who goes through it is now an expert... from now on,if the pedal goes soft from old fluid you simply siphon the reservoir, refill, and push the good stuff through the lines. ... you don't need to remove caliper. . . takes minutes
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I've had great results with removing the bleeder screws, wrapping the threads with teflon tape/plumbers tape, putting them back in and bleeding with the tried and true, squeeze brake, open bleeder, close, repeat. This greatly increases the effectiveness of brake bleeds when air can't get past the threads on the bleeder screws. Try it if you don't believe me. You will have the firmest pedal/lever you've ever had without messing around with speed bleed kits etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
I've had great results with removing the bleeder screws, wrapping the threads with teflon tape/plumbers tape, putting them back in and bleeding with the tried and true, squeeze brake, open bleeder, close, repeat. This greatly increases the effectiveness of brake bleeds when air can't get past the threads on the bleeder screws. Try it if you don't believe me. You will have the firmest pedal/lever you've ever had without messing around with speed bleed kits etc.
Brake fluid dissolves Teflon tape...never a good mix
as long as you close the bleed screw before the pedal hits bottom you won't let air in
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
I get what they're after...but it's the flare that seals...not the threads....however ..air can get in through the threads if the fluid is not moving out of the system...air cannot get in if you close the screw while the pedal is in motion...the tape however will dissolve/disintegrate over time and need to be replaced by completely removing the screw thusly negating any benefit seen in the short term...doing it right will be quicker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
I get what they're after...but it's the flare that seals...not the threads....however ..air can get in through the threads if the fluid is not moving out of the system...air cannot get in if you close the screw while the pedal is in motion...the tape however will dissolve/disintegrate over time and need to be replaced by completely removing the screw thusly negating any benefit seen in the short term...doing it right will be quicker
Really? You guys think tape is going to get into the system?

Use a narrow strip, make sure to not get it down onto the tapered part of the bleed screw. Once the bleeder is tightened down, the tapered part seats against the caliper and seals. No way anything's getting past it.

Even mityvac actually recommends using Teflon tape in one of their FAQ's.

2nd one down in link:

https://www.skf.com/mityvac/contact-and-support/faq/index.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
trying to bleed my clutch yesterday on my s2r - fail - heres my thought on ducati monsters
because they have to hide all the "wiring hoses etc" they create hiccups in the lines
so no matter how many times you bleed them like a regular line you get air
this I know for sure on a s2r you must, not kinda sorta maybe, but must remove the rear brake
its the only way to ensure you get all the air out. infact you have to invert it.
and yesterday doing my clutch line after failing to get a strong pump i looked more closely and
and found a 'gap , pocket, space, zone' that was half way down the line caused by zipcord to the frame
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Yesterday I decided to bleed the rear brake for the first time since buying the bike new. I’ve always had the dealer do it so I could bring it back every time it lost pressure. They replaced the master twice and said it need to be done again. I lost hope with them and never went back. It’s been two years that it has not worked. The lever would go all the way down to the exhaust pipe. I took the caliper off, flipped it over and set it on top of the rotor and bled it the old fashioned way without using my mighty vac. So much air came out it was like foam, kept bleeding more fluid through the system and five minutes later I have a solid pedal again. Only time will tell how long it lasts but it’s the best it’s ever felt.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top