Buying a Monster 821 - Ducati Monster Forums: Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum
 8Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2015, 11:02 AM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 3
Buying a Monster 821

Hi, I want to buy a Monster 821, but I just read Consumer Reports' resent survey and they rank Ducati as one of the most unreliable motorcycle brands. I don't know if this result can be affected by bikes built before VW's take over, or maybe by some specific components and the rest of the bike is perfectly reliable. The survey doesn't consider bikes older then 4 years.

I would like to know your opinion and experience. Im buying this bike as my main form of transportation and for daily use, so apart from having fallen in love with the Monster, I really need it to be reliable ad trouble free. Plus, truth be told, Im stretching my budget considerably so I also cant afford a money pit.

Thanks for your help and for sharing
grrb is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2015, 12:30 PM
Super Moderator

 
philb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Pittsfield, NH
Posts: 3,910
I did exactly that 22 years ago, and have been riding my Monster daily since. 246,000 miles so far.

If you get one either new, or that has been well cared for, and you care for it well yourself, they are reliable and durable machines.
Do the maintenance. Don't let it sit and rot. Don't fix it if it isn't broken (i.e. consider your modifications carefully). You'll be fine.

As for CR, I'd look closely at their criteria. They are often out of their depth on vehicles.
I remember them rating the Corvette with a black spot for not having rust protection treatments. Well, they failed to consider that the Corvette body is made of fiberglass, which can't rust.

PhilB
Rosso Classico, toytuff and grrb like this.

1993 Ducati M900 Monster "Patina" (265,000 miles, killed by minivan 30Oct17) -- 1995 Ducati M900 (wife's bike) -- 1979 Vespa P200 (daughter's scoot) -- 1964 Vespa GS160 (160cc 2-stroke) -- 1962 Maicoletta scooter (275cc 2-stroke) -- 1960 Heinkel Tourist 103A1 scooter "Elroy" (175cc 4-stroke)
philb is offline  
post #3 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2015, 04:12 PM
Member

 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 70
Well, certainly, the japanese bikes lead the way in reliability. Not only that, but the Japanese bikes are easy to find places to work on and in most towns you will have more than one option for repairs which is helpful if the shop can't solve your problem. You should have a shop where you trust and like the mechanics regardless of what bike you own. You will be spending time there, even for regular maintenance. Ducatis do well if regular maintenance is performed and the bike is cared for. A race tech once told me that Ducati's do well when warmed up for a little bit before each ride. There is a poster that says "Ducati - turning riders into mechanics since 1946" and having owned an 02 M750 I can say that there's more than a grain of truth in it.

When I went bike shopping this year, I was resolved to buy anything but a ducati. I sat on pretty much every naked japanese bike that exists. I fired up quite a few of them and every time I felt "whelmed". Nothing snarled at me. On my way out the door the salesman told me they had just taken in a 2014 M796 on trade with 130 miles on it. Long story short, I now own an 02 M750 and a 2014 M796. I sprung for the 7 year warranty. I've been told the newer bikes are more reliable. Either way I'm covered.

Pound for pound, the Japanese bikes are more reliable. But we trade some of that for whatever speaks to us. A Toyota Camry will spend less time in the shop than a Lamborghini Countach. In the case of the Ducati, for me it's soul and the Ducati DNA that still has enough wolf in it to make it less of a pet and more of a companion.


(And I'm not bashing japanese bikes, the 2016 Yamaha MT-10 looks like a scalpel for asphalt and I'm keen to try it.)
maxwax is offline  
post #4 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2015, 09:03 PM
Super Moderator

 
philb's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Pittsfield, NH
Posts: 3,910
The thread over in .ms brought up a few good points. If you are new to riding, do not buy a Ducati. Ducati does not make any bikes that are suitable for beginners. This would be the case even if you had plenty of money and alternate transportation -- the 821 is not a starter bike.

And depending on a bike for sole transport is a learning exercise in itself.

If you've got at least a couple of years of riding experience, and some practice in riding in bad weather, and while carrying your groceries and such, then the 821 can work fine for you. If you're new to it all, I'd strongly suggest starting with a used Japanese bike under 500cc, or (even better for learning to ride as fulltime transportation) a good size scooter (250cc to 400cc), and do that for a couple years before bumping up to the Duc.

PhilB

1993 Ducati M900 Monster "Patina" (265,000 miles, killed by minivan 30Oct17) -- 1995 Ducati M900 (wife's bike) -- 1979 Vespa P200 (daughter's scoot) -- 1964 Vespa GS160 (160cc 2-stroke) -- 1962 Maicoletta scooter (275cc 2-stroke) -- 1960 Heinkel Tourist 103A1 scooter "Elroy" (175cc 4-stroke)
philb is offline  
post #5 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-06-2015, 09:34 PM
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Location: Topanga Canyon, CA.
Posts: 165
If you're shopping an 821 based on Consumer Reports reliability issues you've utterly, Titanically and completely missed the point of owning a Ducati. This bike is absolutely not for you. Run quickly and directly to your local Honda dealership without looking back. There you will find the most reliable bikes on the planet.
JosephHanna is offline  
post #6 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-07-2015, 05:29 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2015
Posts: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by maxwax View Post
Well, certainly, the japanese bikes lead the way in reliability. Not only that, but the Japanese bikes are easy to find places to work on and in most towns you will have more than one option for repairs which is helpful if the shop can't solve your problem. You should have a shop where you trust and like the mechanics regardless of what bike you own. You will be spending time there, even for regular maintenance. Ducatis do well if regular maintenance is performed and the bike is cared for. A race tech once told me that Ducati's do well when warmed up for a little bit before each ride. There is a poster that says "Ducati - turning riders into mechanics since 1946" and having owned an 02 M750 I can say that there's more than a grain of truth in it.

When I went bike shopping this year, I was resolved to buy anything but a ducati. I sat on pretty much every naked japanese bike that exists. I fired up quite a few of them and every time I felt "whelmed". Nothing snarled at me. On my way out the door the salesman told me they had just taken in a 2014 M796 on trade with 130 miles on it. Long story short, I now own an 02 M750 and a 2014 M796. I sprung for the 7 year warranty. I've been told the newer bikes are more reliable. Either way I'm covered.

Pound for pound, the Japanese bikes are more reliable. But we trade some of that for whatever speaks to us. A Toyota Camry will spend less time in the shop than a Lamborghini Countach. In the case of the Ducati, for me it's soul and the Ducati DNA that still has enough wolf in it to make it less of a pet and more of a companion.


(And I'm not bashing japanese bikes, the 2016 Yamaha MT-10 looks like a scalpel for asphalt and I'm keen to try it.)
Completely agree with you Max, Im sold on the passion side of things, and Im willing to pay extra for the bike, for services and parts. Im also willing to tolerate some quirks and resolve some problems/challenges.

But I want to now what am I going to be dealing with, what I can expect to have to solve and repair. I have owned good and bad products, the truth is that not all products are created equal, and some are always braking down, if not for one thing its for the other. In my experience, that can destroy any passion or fun, and you end up like a drug addict chasing the first high. This happened to me recently with a BRP product, thats why Im being more careful this time and trying to understand what I will have to deal with.

Honestly Im hoping that since VW's take over this bikes are more reliable and offer better service, like what happened to Lamborghini.

Thanks for sharing your experience!
grrb is offline  
post #7 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-07-2015, 07:47 PM
Member

 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 70
They certainly aren't bad like a range rover is. They do require regular upkeep and when they do break, it's going to cost more to fix. I would consider a local ducati mechanic you trust a necessity.

It is a great way to learn to work on your own bike. Besides the maintenance there's no end of customization that you can do. Most monsters are unique and an expression of their owner's personality.

I look forward to seeing yours.

Welcome to the club.
grrb likes this.
maxwax is offline  
post #8 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-08-2015, 06:58 AM
Senior Member
 
rolandantrobus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 102
Just go to the Ducati dealer, blag a test ride and you'll be hooked for life. Problem solved!
grrb likes this.

M796 20th Anniversary
Mods
Datatag, Tender lead, 796 Bikini fairing, 900ss Frame plugs, Gold alternator cover, Remus "gold" badges, DP comfort seat, HealTech gear indicator, Toby steering damper, Vicma clear mirrors and Indicator bleepers.
rolandantrobus is offline  
post #9 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-09-2015, 09:05 AM
Senior Member
 
marlene996's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Davis CA and Apeldoorn, Netherlands
Posts: 220
Garage
Quote:
Originally Posted by philb View Post
I did exactly that 22 years ago, and have been riding my Monster daily since. 246,000 miles so far.

....
Do the maintenance. Don't let it sit and rot. Don't fix it if it isn't broken (i.e. consider your modifications carefully). You'll be fine.


PhilB
The 821 is brand spanking new bike from Ducati with a lot of new style things on it, so you're not going to learn a lot about longevity by asking around because no one knows. The only thing most people can tell you is if they have any lemon issues when they got home with it. Test ride one, and take it home or don't. If you want something people can help you with, buy something from the last generation of models... M696/796/1100. Exactly as Phil said it, if you treat these bikes well, they will treat you well too. Find a good mechanic (or do it yourself) but don't skimp on maintenance.

P.S. 246,000 on a Ducati. You're an inspiration Phil! Now I am going to tell this when someone says, "yea, but it's a Ducati".
philb likes this.

"I have to get a licence to drive a motorcycle to protect myself and the people around me. I am adamant there should be some sort of licensing required to have children." - Tim Allen

2002 CB750 SOLD
2010 M1100 Silver
2009 M1100S Red
marlene996 is offline  
post #10 of 14 (permalink) Old 12-09-2015, 10:21 AM
Senior Member
 
1UglyBastard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: NOLA
Posts: 1,928
I use my 1100 EVO a lot for daily commuting and I've had to fix a few things on it that I normally wouldn't have on my old Hondas.

- Battery died prematurely. Easy fix, but 14 months after getting a lithium battery, this one may be going as well. I wonder if it's a charging system problem or, more likely, that turning this motor over, along with all the electronics, is too hard on the battery.

- Stator died early. I had to replace it at 14,300 miles. Semi easy fix if you know how to wrench on your bike. It was also hard to find a stator for the EVO. It uses a unique size stator that doesn't even match the 1100 or 1100S.

- Chain stretched at 11,000 miles. Again, easy fix if you have the tools and know how. Still, I take care of my chains. It should have lasted me 20,000+ miles.

- It won't start, and I don't know why. I dropped it off at the dealer, and they're looking at it. My suspicion is it's an electrical; their electrical system is very cutting edge and must still have some bugs. My bike turns over slowly, and won't turn on. Tried jumping it, that didn't work. Valve check has been done. I've owned several bikes and this is a unique problem for me. On my Hondas I was able to fix any problem that came my way, and the motor was solid.

If this were my only transportation, I'd be in a car rental right now. For a sole form of transportation, I'd go with Japanese. Ducati, from my experience, is a luxury, which is why I also have a little Ninja 300 as a back up, which always starts with no problem.
grrb likes this.

Last edited by 1UglyBastard; 12-09-2015 at 10:24 AM.
1UglyBastard is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Ducati Monster Forums: Ducati Monster Motorcycle Forum forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in













Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome